Downsizing due to Brexit and the cost of Machinary.

Discussion in 'Direct Drilling Machinery' started by TWF, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Hi this is a bit of an advert really but we are giving up a 1600ac contracting farming agreement because with 25%+ increase in machinery costs since 2010 its hard to make any money.It would have needed a very large spend to keep going. The big JD tractor and Case Combine both being six years old.
    So the big 300hp tractor has gone and I have a 6m Claydon Hybrid drill with front fertilizer tank for sale. We used it mainly for drilling OSR and blew DAP down the front legs. The Paddle boards left it a bit open so we used to follow it with a Tilso Rake and Roll with a Vaderstad 360 bio-Drill putting on slug pellets. The rake leveled the ground and the roll patted it down. This is also for sale.

    So we are now down sizing to one less tractor. A JD 6215 now will be my big tractor. More DDing with the Amazone Cayanna 6001c that I will keep . I am hoping to replace the rake with a Vaderstad Carrier with the new zig zag cutting disc and straw harrow on it, to hopefully chop up cover crops and keep the Cayanna tine drill working. Trying not to go to a disc drill yet. Have a very old Moore drill in reserve.
    Here's hoping we have done the right thing. TWF
     
    Brisel, Robert, Timbo and 6 others like this.
  2. Flat 10

    Flat 10 Member

    Location:
    Fen Edge
    Good luck. Hope it works for you. Its done now.
     
    TWF likes this.
  3. warksfarmer

    warksfarmer Member

    The person taking that 1600 ac on now in the lead up to brexit must be bonkers because if he/she already has 1600 ac of surplus capacity then they are set up wrong already, but likewise if they are reequipping to do the extra work then they are mad ...... completely mad. There are to many variables in BPS, potential food imports, machinery price hikes due to unfavourable trade agreements all underlined by the fact the government want the UK to be an organic producer and gardening haven rather than a commercial producer. Now is the time to consolidate and prepare for the potential future, and not take risks.
     
    TWF likes this.
  4. Tom H

    Tom H Member

    Location:
    Vale of Belvoir
    Thing is that a very big 3000ha farm can swallow that without any re-equipping. I'm not saying they are making any real cash though! Fair play to @TWF though. It take some level headedness, the ability to know you cost and hold back the emotion to give up a big chunk. Best of luck.
     
    TWF likes this.
  5. mikep

    mikep Member

    Do the maths. You can make as much with low input spring barley using less equipment and have a life as you can with being a busy fool and winter wheat unless you can guarantee four tonne and no BG.
     
  6. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Spring Barley caused a bit of hart ache this year, 900 ac of it late drilled. Trying to put half of it into winter OSR in August is going to be another challenge.
     
    Steevo and Brisel like this.
  7. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    To be fair 250 ac of it is waist ground and just topped. But there was no BPS involved. So the profit share was heavily weighted in my favor. The trouble being a large shoot and wet harvests tended to leave little profit to top up the contractors first fee.
     
    glasshouse likes this.
  8. mikep

    mikep Member

    Depends on many things and land is the most important. Our late drilled SB looks ok but the WW is rubbish (1/2 sprayed off rest should have been). My point is that SB is a low input crop whereas WW generally isn't. I know some smart arse will grow 5ta with one herbicide but generally it is selling for not much above the price of production so that's a lot of work for nothing as you can draw your sub by sitting on your arse. Without a sub your knackered really.
     
    Flat 10 likes this.
  9. Funny really, on those acres could you not have grassed 500 acre down and taken in dairy heifers, or grown turnips for winter sheep keep?
    Why the fascination with combinables only?
    Not a single chance I would give up that kind of area without at least looking at something different.
     
  10. Repeat

    Repeat Member

    Location:
    Cumbria
    that's a very cumbrian view of it,there's no waste ground north of shap, if you just topped anything your neighbours would think you were on the way out
     
    hally and SeatWarmer like this.
  11. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Heavy hanslope clay. When wet not much would move on it. The 250 ac s of fallow is best left as it isn't drained and some is flood plane. No fences.

     
  12. if Brexit suits the rest of the economy after 2022
    the £ increases in value
    no ag subs
    enviromentle payment similar to mid tier
    free trade import of grains

    there will be a lot more acres available for the lowest cost per tonne contractors
    the biggest issue will be the quality of the land drainage on deeper soils and the depth of soil on thinner soils

    the target
    one pass with the drill controlled traffic
    2 passes with the fert spreader
    4 passes with the sprayer
    harvest
    moles drain every 4 years if properly drained and enough clay

    or top once every 3 years collect environmentle payment
     
    ajd132, warksfarmer, legin and 2 others like this.
  13. warksfarmer

    warksfarmer Member


    This above but with an organic slant. The vegans are coming ......
     
  14. Brisel

    Brisel Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    A brave and well though out move. Good to see the effective use of a calculator to drive a major business decision. I think there will be opportunities post Brexit so never say never again.

    I have a 6m Hybrid, rake & rolls with Biodrill. I've never raked after drilling but accepted the furrows may need an extra dose of sluggies.
     
  15. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Yes we used to go at about 15 degree angle and it did a really good job. We were only using the Claydon to drill the osr the last few years as I prefer to use an Amozone Cayenna with it closser row spacing and narrow tine to drill the wheat and S.Barley. The packer works so well we don't roll after it.
     
  16. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    So your profit feeds the landowners pheasants? got that t shirt.
     
    Bumble Bee likes this.
  17. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Yes it certainly makes it quite difficult to farm around a shoot. You need a good relationship with the keeper with lots of give and take. In the early days it wasn't to bad as we were drilled up by the end of September. Agromanist had the hardest job trying to walk crops with out moving too many birds off the place.
     
  18. Brisel

    Brisel Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    It's usually the 'keeper taking & the grower giving in my experience
     
  19. Interesting decision and to echo above comments it's laudable that you have followed the logic of the numbers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
  20. TWF

    TWF Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Your proberley right but we kept talking to him and he would clear a field of partridges just before dark for drilling. We have a small shoot at home so there is a bit of sympathy. There are parts of the farm not shot by the in hand shoot that we saved for nighttime 24hr drilling. I am also a tenant to the Estate so can also just move through the hegde and be off the centre core of the shoot. But it is all pita and it all adds up to not being worth all the hassle for very little.
     

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