Drilling and not putting in tramlines but adding autosteer to the sprayer?

JCfarmer

Member
Location
warks
I know a few of you already do this, do you have much trouble with green grains come harvest?
Do you use egnos or a more accurate signal?
I will have an autopilot steering system which will be available off a tractor which is being sold and a new 5m drill but on 24m tramlines so rather than drill at 4.8m and alter coulters I am tempted to stick with 5m.
I could extend the sprayer but not ideal for the fert spinner.
 

HarryB97

Member
Mixed Farmer
Never put tramlines in and have no issues at all just makes the whole job much easier! My tractor is on 30cm gps accuracy and it's very good, be it mowing or drilling it's all spot on.
 

Dalos

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Shropshire
So how do you actually spray the tramlines in , just a quad bike sprayer with 2 nozzles behind the tractor wheels or another way ?
 

B'o'B

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Rutland
I know a few of you already do this, do you have much trouble with green grains come harvest?
Do you use egnos or a more accurate signal?
I will have an autopilot steering system which will be available off a tractor which is being sold and a new 5m drill but on 24m tramlines so rather than drill at 4.8m and alter coulters I am tempted to stick with 5m.
I could extend the sprayer but not ideal for the fert spinner.
No bother with green grains here, but you do want to be on a significantly better correction than EGNOS
 

jack6480

Member
Location
Staffs
you need RTK accuracy for drilling. Forget about tramlining every year use your old tramlines.

 

tw15

Member
Location
DORSET
So how do you actually spray the tramlines in , just a quad bike sprayer with 2 nozzles behind the tractor wheels or another way ?
I just use a trimble 500 with easy steer set at 23.885 m and works a treat on liquid fert so if it was out you soon see . never spray the tramlines just save the fields and after a couple of passes the tramlines are easy to see . no problem with greens .
 

haybob

Member
Livestock Farmer
I noticed my contractors claas knife doesn't seem to cut the short green heads in tramlines. Took on some land which was already cropped but with wrong sized tramlines. Wasn't any trouble. Carried the sprayer better.
 

Longneck

Member
Rangepoint is fine, I’ve been doing it the last 5 years.
You do get a few greens some years, depends on how late you run through with the last pass on the sprayer.
The first year I rigged a little sprayer up to spray out the tramlines but it wasn’t worth it.
As said before it helps the sprayer travel in wetter times and it definitely takes a lot of the stress out of drilling.
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
I know a few of you already do this, do you have much trouble with green grains come harvest?
Do you use egnos or a more accurate signal?
I will have an autopilot steering system which will be available off a tractor which is being sold and a new 5m drill but on 24m tramlines so rather than drill at 4.8m and alter coulters I am tempted to stick with 5m.
I could extend the sprayer but not ideal for the fert spinner.

well over a decade since we put a tramline in with a drill, fixed tramlines put in with the sprayer

never had a problem at harvest, can’t imagine why you would tramline with a drill if you can with the sprayer


we rarely use pre harvest glyphosate as well
 

Hard Graft

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
British Isles
You need accurate gps on the sprayer ideally
Did not have an rtk subscription correction last year on the case sp3000 and on plough sown crops was through then 3 times on auto steer as could not see my previous wheel marks but then had to resort to manually steering
 

35% of English and Welsh farmers possibly/probably depressed

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) has today, Thursday, October 14, published the findings of The Big Farming Survey, which shows 35% of English and Welsh farmers are either possibly or probably depressed.

The survey, based on over 15,000 responses, concentrates on the health and well-being of the farming community in England and Wales in the 2020s.

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) is a national charity that provides support to the farming community across England and Wales.

Mental health​


Mental well-being, the survey notes, describes our ability to cope with the ‘ups and downs’ of everyday life.

According to the survey, 14% of the farming community is ‘possibly depressed’ while...
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