Employee wanting to borrow machinery

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
If he has the ticket to drive the machine he should know what is and is not allowed
doesn't matter...insurance wise if something goes wrong it could be a can of worms...that said my nfu mutual rep said they know farmers borrow machines from each other....mind you another time she told me not to lend out my post knocker:scratchhead:....best thing for op is talk to insurers....if they say no he has his excuse
 
doesn't matter...insurance wise if something goes wrong it could be a can of worms...that said my nfu mutual rep said they know farmers borrow machines from each other....mind you another time she told me not to lend out my post knocker:scratchhead:....best thing for op is talk to insurers....if they say no he has his excuse
The hire - ee would / should have his own insurance surely, we always do when we hire a extra tractor.

Hirer can Ask for it up front , why not .
 

egbert

Member
Our farm employee wants to borrow our JCB to help his Dad put some roof trusses up on a new shed he's building at home.
Don't want to be miserable and say he can't use it, not bothered about the fuel or the hours of use etc. I just really want to make sure we're right with insurance. Massive liability to us if something were to go wrong while he was doing something outside of the business use. Any thoughts?
It'd depend on several variables for me.

I've sound'uns around me who i'm happy to take gear off site to do a job - at a notional rate of exchange, and a 'you feck you fix it' rule.
Others I've known I'd hardly trust on site in my immediate presence.

Is the job an easy safe lift on level ground, or are envelopes being pushed?

Is the machine right up to scratch in the event of an incident?

If in doubt, find an excuse.
Or, as said, trundle over yourself, keep everything sweet.
 

Fendt

Member
Thanks for the opinions.
He’s a good lad on the whole so no worries there really. Machine is only a couple of years old so no worries there. My fear is literally the risk of something going wrong, they have a small accident on site, or even something stupid happens like pulling out of the drive and hitting a car. It wouldn’t take much for it all to come falling down around us.
 
If its not in ‘work time’ does the insurance cover him? I know some have had issues with this when travelling in works vehicles to get to and from work
If its playing on your mind id offer to drive it, seems the most sensible solution
 

Forever Fendt

Member
Location
Derbyshire
I have not read all the posts but if it’s not going to take long go and drive it yourself and do the job for them then all will be happy and he will owe you a favour you may need to recall and it will stop it becoming a habit
 

Fendt

Member
It is only a small shed, total of 8 roof trusses I think, probably no more than 4 metres off the floor. Reasonably tight working space with a big machine. Don’t suppose they’ll have any other appropriate gear, eg proper ladders, straps, safety gear etc so can assume other stuff will be borrowed as well. I was happy to nip round there the other day when he rang to ask if I could unload said trusses from the lorry, no mention made at the time that he might want to borrow the teleporter to put them up. Just sprang that on me today and when I said no (because of insurance concerns) he looked very dejected. I have no problem with helping the lad or his father, we have and do get on well. I can just see a small mishap turning into a massive problem. They have nothing to lose whereas I could potentially end up uninsured with a big claim from something going wrong. I think I know what the answer is honestly. Even if I go and do the lifting for them I have a feeling it would be completely uninsured at my own risk, will check the policy.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
175,939
Messages
4,013,062
Members
44,055
Latest member
ALC23

Project Lamport 2020

  • 427
  • 0

Project Lamport, now in its seventh year, is the UK’s leading R&D trials event. The original concept aimed to develop a cultural approach to blackgrass control, but has since evolved over the years. The site now explores improving soil health, as well as a comprehensive research project that investigates the impact of cultivations, compaction and cover crops on soil structure, organic matter and microbiology.

Expect weekly updates on Project Lamport, allowing you to participate in the entire journey rather than just the final product. These updates conclude with the official Project Lamport site demonstration and a live Q&A with our experts on the 15th of July.

Read more about the different systems at...
Top