Employing a vet

dinderleat

Member
Location
Wells
Thoughts? does anyone do it? Does it work? The only down side I would see you would loose the pool of knowledge from using a practice.
 

capfits

Member
At present there is a real shortage of clinicians be they large or small animal vets.
You would still need some kind of link to a larger practice for continuity to cover weekends holidays CPD.
Perhaps a better idea if you cannot afford 2 gets then going with one of the large animal specialist groups ie XL.
I have thought at times a farmer cooperative Vet practice maybe the way forward. It has happened in the past, it was how a few practices started until they could pay out the farmers that initiated the coop.
Still a model that is used in New Zealand so I am told
 

dinderleat

Member
Location
Wells
I don’t think emergency cover would be an issue. Plus I would hope early intervention would possibly stop the need for emergency cover, but obviously there are occasions.
 

puppet

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
sw scotland
Big dairy near here, 1000+ cows and as many followers. Used to employ a vet but not now. Farmer does all the scanning, 2 men all the locomotion assessment and trimming weekly. Very modern set-up and a young herd due to a high replacement rate of any cows not performing and apparently hardly see a vet now
 

early riser

Member
Location
Up North
A lot of farm vets will only be on a £25-35k salary package so employing one instead of a herd manager might not be as expensive an option as you think.

However main limitation is the cost of all the specialist kit (scanner etc) that you would suddenly need.
 
Location
Devon
My understanding is, Animal health [or whoever is the regulatory body] will not let a vet solely employed by a business to dispense drugs to that business.
If you employ your own vet, you may still have to buy drugs through a practice.
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Drugs is not an issue. Vet can write a prescription then you can source from cheapest.

There are two issues. One is the vet getting stale as having more than one pair of eyes definitely benefits Farms. Second issue is cover OOHs and holidays. Local practices are not often happy to step in unless they are still getting the drugs sales.
 

Hesstondriver

Member
Location
Huntingdon
They may start on 30K but a lot of partners are on 100K +. Then there is continual training and personal development. Possibly an option for a very large farm but even then a bright vet would get bored with the same thing everyday. Marrying one is probably the best option.
IME
Vet costs go down - i agree (y)
other costs go up :banghead:


and i guess if one of either party is already married costs go up even further :nailbiting:

"renting it by the hour is still going to be cheaper"
 

dinderleat

Member
Location
Wells
Sort your farm out so you don't need a vet as much
We only see our vet when there tb testing
Fertility - use more fertile bulls
Calving-- use easy calving bulls
Feet-- get someone trained to trim and get a decent crush
It was more of paying someone a good wage that has the skills and expertise of a vet to do the stock work with the added benefit of never needing to call the vet out.

Seeing as it seems a herdperson is getting paid more than newly qualified vets.
 

In the pit

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Pembrokeshire
It was more of paying someone a good wage that has the skills and expertise of a vet to do the stock work with the added benefit of never needing to call the vet out.

Seeing as it seems a herdperson is getting paid more than newly qualified vets.
Can we attract them into milking
 
IME
Vet costs go down - i agree (y)
other costs go up :banghead:


and i guess if one of either party is already married costs go up even further :nailbiting:

"renting it by the hour is still going to be cheaper"
Don't do it!

I used to have a great life, stupid fast cars, played xbox all the time, more money than I could spend.

Now im doing none of the above and my jeans are from Tescos but hell check out the quality of my soft furnishings and interior decor!
 
They may start on 30K but a lot of partners are on 100K +. Then there is continual training and personal development. Possibly an option for a very large farm but even then a bright vet would get bored with the same thing everyday. Marrying one is probably the best option.
There isn't the same potential to be a partner as practices sell out to big companies now. A lot of vets graduate, do 4-7 years and hit 30 before realising where its heading and changing career. Being fairly clever people they can do it quite readily.

Had someone try to talk me into studying as a Vet. No fudging way with cherries on top.
 
Don't do it!

I used to have a great life, stupid fast cars, played xbox all the time, more money than I could spend.

Now im doing none of the above and my jeans are from Tescos but hell check out the quality of my soft furnishings and interior decor!
Marriage? Don’t like your wife ?
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
There isn't the same potential to be a partner as practices sell out to big companies now. A lot of vets graduate, do 4-7 years and hit 30 before realising where its heading and changing career. Being fairly clever people they can do it quite readily.

Had someone try to talk me into studying as a Vet. No fudging way with cherries on top.
Correct! Hence why I’m back on the family farm earning a fortune - oh wait
 

Forum statistics

Threads
184,260
Messages
4,195,349
Members
46,163
Latest member
Farming life at la forge

CHAP launches CropMonitor Pro a new digital service for predicting crop pest and disease risks

  • 110
  • 0
CHAP launches CropMonitor Pro â a new digital service for predicting crop pest and disease risks

CHAP is delighted to announce the launch of a new digital service – Crop Monitor Pro. It is designed to help growers and agronomists predict the likelihood of pest and disease outbreaks on their farm.

CropMonitor Pro extends the DEFRA funded, long-standing regional risk evaluation service (Crop Monitor) which was first launched in 2003 by Fera Science Limited (Fera). CropMonitor Pro is a significant advancement on that service by providing field-level risk prediction for a range of pests and diseases affecting winter wheat, winter oilseed rape and...
Top