ENdurance slow release N.

Flat 10

Member
Location
Fen Edge
I would dismiss it as snake oil but it clearly has a nutritional content and the best grower of sugar beet I know uses it religiously. Not cheap at £1300ish I think for an ibc and used at 20lit/ha. Anybody any views or experience.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Can it be bought in small quantities???
I'd try a few random tramlines and see if you get and visual difference.

If you get on with your fieldsman then they are usually pretty keen to do test digs and put them throught the tare house.

I think there could be something in it, often beet go yellow later in the season when they run out of N and that's where muck helps as it's a slow release, the best beet are always on old muck pads so that tells you something.
 
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HarryB97

Member
Mixed Farmer
Bought 4 hectares worth and used it on several tramlines in several fields of wheat on our gravely land this year. To early to comment yet though.
 
I'm interested to hear also,

I enquired about efficient n last Yr for maize and I don't think it's a Hutchinson exclusive, as I recall £1300 wouldn't buy a cube either, so if there's a £30/ha option I'd be interested to know
 

Bogweevil

Member
Sounds like the methylene urea/urea used by groundsmen for quality turf, E2Pro for example. Widely offered in small packs if you wanted to experiment.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Methylene urea is urea and formaldehyde mixed/formulated together if I'm correct so my question is, does the methylene act like a normal inhibitor would an granular urea by slowing the ureas enzyme and thus making the urea become available more slowly????? Or is there more to it than that.🤷
 

Bogweevil

Member
Methylene urea is urea and formaldehyde mixed/formulated together if I'm correct so my question is, does the methylene act like a normal inhibitor would an granular urea by slowing the ureas enzyme and thus making the urea become available more slowly????? Or is there more to it than that.🤷

My understanding is that the methylated urea molecule is more slowly broken into ammonia by soil microbes than other inorganic N sources.
 
So how does the methylated urea help for foliar application vs straight urea?

I can't really remember but I thought urea was scorchy? Does the methylated bit help that?

I just looked it up and was quoted £1575 for an ibc of efficient n and 1765 for yara safe n last June, idoubt they are cheaper this Yr.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Rather than use Yara safe N at 1765 quid for a ibc couldn't you just add 10-20 Lt of adblu at 260 quid an ibc🤷 it's not slow release but it is only 32% urea at the end of the day
 
I have pallets of food grade urea prills here, we add it to milking cow rations, I guess the best option is a few hand trials to determine max safe concentration?
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Methylene urea is urea and formaldehyde mixed/formulated together if I'm correct so my question is, does the methylene act like a normal inhibitor would an granular urea by slowing the ureas enzyme and thus making the urea become available more slowly????? Or is there more to it than that.🤷
I wonder if putting formaldehyde onto our soil is a good idea?
 

Chalky

Member
I dont think it is urea & formaldehyde. Think it is using methylene/formaldehyde wording to describe the chemical compound type which is a polymer in applied form. The applied fertiliser is the reaction product created under specific circumstances. Bit like a strong acid metal mix could be table salt.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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