Estimating the annual yield of a plot of land

tombe

Member
Hi everyone, apologies for another novice question:

Let's say the average wheat yield is 8 tonnes per hectare and I have a hectare that I want to use for wheat production one year. Given that some types of wheat can be planted in the spring and harvested in the autumn, and others can be planted in the autumn and harvested in the spring, should I expect 8 tonnes a year from that hectare or around twice that if I plant twice a year? Is it right to use a plot of land twice a year for the same crop? I expect it would cause soil depletion, but perhaps planting something else in that hectare the next year will help with that?
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
Wheat crops planted in the autumn are harvested the following autumn (10 months later)

Wheat crops planted in the spring are harvested the following autumn (6 months later)


I think you would be lucky to harvest 8 tonnes from a single hectare. The 8 tonnes per hectare is an average for big and small fields. Smaller fields contain a greater proportion of headland (outer border) which will much yield less than the middle of the field. In a single hectare field that could be 50% of the area or more, compared to 25-30% or less in a field size of 10 or 40 hectares.
 

Wombat

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East yorks
Hi everyone, apologies for another novice question:

Let's say the average wheat yield is 8 tonnes per hectare and I have a hectare that I want to use for wheat production one year. Given that some types of wheat can be planted in the spring and harvested in the autumn, and others can be planted in the autumn and harvested in the spring, should I expect 8 tonnes a year from that hectare or around twice that if I plant twice a year? Is it right to use a plot of land twice a year for the same crop? I expect it would cause soil depletion, but perhaps planting something else in that hectare the next year will help with that?
Are u in the U.K.?

if so you will only get one cereal crop a year. Planted in Autumn harvested the following Summer or planted in spring and harvested in summer,

that would also ring true for most of Europe
 

Bogweevil

Member
Wheat crops planted in the autumn are harvested the following autumn (10 months later)

Wheat crops planted in the spring are harvested the following autumn (6 months later)


I think you would be lucky to harvest 8 tonnes from a single hectare. The 8 tonnes per hectare is an average for big and small fields. Smaller fields contain a greater proportion of headland (outer border) which will much yield less than the middle of the field. In a single hectare field that could be 50% of the area or more, compared to 25-30% or less in a field size of 10 or 40 hectares.
Oh I don't know, she could cover a hectare with polytunnels to boost growth and control disease, use plant support nets to eliminate lodging, add irrigation and sterilise the soil to eliminate weeds and easily grow 25 ,tonnes of rather expensive wheat.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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