EU sausage war

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
Real time, living, slow motion proof that the British Brexit Establishment is incapable of negotiating trade deals, which don’t end up hurting itself and its citizens.
EU absolutely nailed the amateurs to the floor on this agreement. Japan cut and pasted the deal they had with the EU, chopped and changed the details to give themselves a better outcome, drafted it up, and told Lizzie where to sign.
Now the Aussies are up to the same tricks. Lizzie will buckle. No question.
This “sovereignty” thing isn‘t all that it’s cracked up to be….
None of us know the real tempo of the negotiations. It could be that there was only two real options; accept want the EU were offering or no deal whatsoever. Perhaps the UK should have called their bluff and said “sorry we can’t accept these compromises so no deal” we’d probably be in a mess right now but down the line maybe better off. Is leaving is a precedence so it is in charted waters. The voters voted leave and it that didn’t suit the EU, you and millions of others but that’s our system of voting good or bad. Northern Ireland is a delicate matter and the EU know it so have used it as a lever in this exit matter.
 
Have you ever actually been abroad and seen some of their standards, lots of times I think when there ,we wouldnt be allowed to do that.
I have spent many months in EU countries and agree that the way regs are implemented domestically are far less rigorous than in the UK - But we are talking about International trade over borders
 

robs1

Member
I have spent many months in EU countries and agree that the way regs are implemented domestically are far less rigorous than in the UK - But we are talking about International trade over borders
So our standards are not lower then are they so why post it, you criticise politicians for making false statements yet you have just done the same.
 

Muck Spreader

Member
Location
Limousin
Shouldn't the same apply to all EU products such as meat, cheese, yogurts etc entering the UK as well as flowers plants etc, these should all be subject to the same restrictions & paperwork!
Yes, but you have a government consisting of imbeciles who despite having 4.5 years to set it up, didn't do anything. Presumably they were waiting for the Brexit fairy to sort it all out! :ROFLMAO:
 

BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
Yes, but you have a government consisting of imbeciles who despite having 4.5 years to set it up, didn't do anything. Presumably they were waiting for the Brexit fairy to sort it all out! :ROFLMAO:
The thing is should Boris wake up & impose the same rules & regs it would be incumbent on the EU to make sure all their paperwork was in order before crossing the channel with all the bureaucracy that involved, couple of bumptious busy bodies our side & if paperwork not ok turn them around & send them back onto the next boat home! Life can easily be made more difficult for ALL concerned!
 

arcobob

Member
Location
Norfolk
Yes, but you have a government consisting of imbeciles who despite having 4.5 years to set it up, didn't do anything. Presumably they were waiting for the Brexit fairy to sort it all out! :ROFLMAO:
I suppose Theresa May was a Brexit fairy, or certainly behaved like one. Anyway, as is usual, the point has been missed that it takes two sides to come to an agreement and the primary motive of one side was to deliberately make things difficult. Never mind, every dog has its day.
 

BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
Okay, what's the solution then? Seems to me we either need a border (NI/GB or NI/EU) or we need no reason to have a border (customs union/ agreement on standards). Is there a third way?
Maybe a simple free trade agreement with provisos that the EU have when it suits their purpose
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
David Trimble and others pushed this idea
A self policing land border without a border between EU and NI? I can't see that working, based on past history of the situation.

"This approach replaces the controversial minutiae of operational and technical procedures with a legal obligation on each side to ensure the enforcement of the other side’s rules and standards."

Do you think it would be viable?
 

nivilla1982

Member
Livestock Farmer
A self policing land border without a border between EU and NI? I can't see that working, based on past history of the situation.

"This approach replaces the controversial minutiae of operational and technical procedures with a legal obligation on each side to ensure the enforcement of the other side’s rules and standards."

Do you think it would be viable?
Trimble makes the argument that some of the bodies created by the Belfast Agreement can be used to create the structure for such a system.
"The institutional framework established by the GFA - especially the British Irish Council (BIC) and the British Irish Intergovernmental Conference under Strand Three - provide for the necessary cooperation required to make a Mutual Enforcement structure work. The BIC mandate is very broad - to
“promote the harmonious and mutually beneficial development of the totality of relationships among
the peoples of these islands.”
Moreover, the BIC anticipates that it can be used to discuss EU issues and comes with an obligation to
“exchange information, discuss, consult and use best endeavours to reach agreement on cooperation on matters of mutual interest within the competence of the relevant Administrations.
Suitable issues for early discussion in the BIC could include transport links, agricultural issues,
environmental issues, cultural issues, health issues, education issues and approaches to EU issues.”
The GFA is affirmed and “protected in all its parts” by the Protocol, even though the Protocol is in fact
inconsistent with the GFA. The GFA imposes best endeavours obligations on Ireland and the UK as
described above. The use of the BIC therefore to discuss the modalities of a system such as Mutual
Enforcement to remove the need for border infrastructure is not merely an option; it is an obligation on
both the UK and Irish State."

Though it would requires political willingness from all sides etc, so big if etc.
 
Last edited:

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
Maybe a simple free trade agreement with provisos that the EU have when it suits their purpose
The problem is when standards drift over time - we start allowing in US beef with hormones a possibility (don't say it won't happen, it might), or we decide to reduce the permittage wattage on hairdryers to stop power cuts but the EU remain as is. Given we can't agree on the basics now, I have zero faith that the co operation would be adequate for long term.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
The thing is should Boris wake up & impose the same rules & regs it would be incumbent on the EU to make sure all their paperwork was in order before crossing the channel with all the bureaucracy that involved, couple of bumptious busy bodies our side & if paperwork not ok turn them around & send them back onto the next boat home! Life can easily be made more difficult for ALL concerned!
Absolutely.
Coming in at the end of the month.
The problem is simple, If Boris signed to keep the same standards as the EU there would be no USA trade deal.
As he cant sign to keep the same standards you will be importing to the uk meat and other products that are banned in the EU.
You cant send them to NI as Southern Irish shoppers are free to cross the border and there are no ongoing checks to mainland EU.
Its a cakeist deal.
 

Ashtree

Member
Isn’t it a shame that the good unionist people of NI, decided to largely turn their backs on the UUP, in favour of the more extreme DUP.
Having speed read through that link from @nivilla1982 , there does seem to be some innovating thinking from the Trimble camp. He did innovate and take political risk to deliver the GFA, but of course was electorally destroyed afterwards.

If I were a unionist in 2021, I think I’d prefer to have UUP stock as the main unionist party. I would wager, if they were in Westminster during May’s premiership, the whole of the UK would today be in the customs union, and the UK union would be safe. The sometimes delicate art of compromise is best left to calm rational people.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
As already said at post 58 just make NI a freeport the same as the Isle of Man. It works well in IOM so why not NI. Basically goods would be able to move as free trade EU to NI or UK to NI but what is not allowed is EU to UK via NI and vice versa unless in sealed units with border control at NI ports making sure seals are still intact.Then normal rules like Dover Calais would apply. Job sorted.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
As already said at post 58 just make NI a freeport the same as the Isle of Man. It works well in IOM so why not NI. Basically goods would be able to move as free trade EU to NI or UK to NI but what is not allowed is EU to UK via NI and vice versa unless in sealed units with border control at NI ports making sure seals are still intact.Then normal rules like Dover Calais would apply. Job sorted.
Seems sensible. Whats the catch?
 
So our standards are not lower then are they so why post it, you criticise politicians for making false statements yet you have just done the same.
Our standards have been tied into EU standards or sometimes higher, but politicians are hell bent on reducing those standards to allow surpluses from around the world to be dumped in the UK - That is why the EU will not be allowing unregulated exports to the EU including NI. There is nothing in these regulations which UK was unaware of when cobbling together the NI Protocol which protects the GFA.
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

  • 69
  • 0
Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
Top