EU sausage war

Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
But you do when you start importing from the Rest of the World. Mogg
In a hard-hitting report, he urges Mrs May to spend less time bartering with Brussels and focus on countries who can deliver cheaper food and clothing — such as the US, India, China and Brazil.
Nah, this is all politics for adult kindergarten kids. Always the game played by Mutti and that ars'' napoleon was to annex NI as retribution to the Leave campaign for shafting the EU. Make life as diffiuclt as possible politically. So the EU making a stand against chilled meats is about par for the course for 5 year olds having a tantrum. I cannot wait to smuggle my Melton Pork Pie into NI for my friend in Londonderry.

I can see it now. Sniffer dogs (wearing EU hi vis dog coats) at belfast docks checking the ferry passengers and vehicles. Hauled to one side and strip searched. yep has the markings of the EU all over it.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
IOM doesn’t have a 310 mile largely undefined border with the EU.
But if the will is there it is easily sorted by making NI a freeport which then solves all problems of goods going into NI and exports from NI. Your only left then with the problem of transit goods between ROI and UK mainland going through NI which can easily be sorted by a bonded warehouse at a NI port. The hassle of using the bonded warehouse will result in direct ferry routes being setup between ROI and UK mainland which then solves the transit goods problem as it then just becomes another Dover Calais scenario for regulation.
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
But if the will is there it is easily sorted by making NI a freeport which then solves all problems of goods going into NI and exports from NI. Your only left then with the problem of transit goods between ROI and UK mainland going through NI which can easily be sorted by a bonded warehouse at a NI port. The hassle of using the bonded warehouse will result in direct ferry routes being setup between ROI and UK mainland which then solves the transit goods problem as it then just becomes another Dover Calais scenario for regulation.
Doesn’t a Freeport have to have some sort of delineation with access controls? The GFA would preclude that, I think.

Also, you seem to conveniently forget goods going in the opposite direction too - the system would need to be acceptable to all parties.
 

JimAndy

Member
Location
portadown
Nah, this is all politics for adult kindergarten kids. Always the game played by Mutti and that ars'' napoleon was to annex NI as retribution to the Leave campaign for shafting the EU. Make life as diffiuclt as possible politically. So the EU making a stand against chilled meats is about par for the course for 5 year olds having a tantrum. I cannot wait to smuggle my Melton Pork Pie into NI for my friend in Londonderry.

I can see it now. Sniffer dogs (wearing EU hi vis dog coats) at belfast docks checking the ferry passengers and vehicles. Hauled to one side and strip searched. yep has the markings of the EU all over it.
Got love brexiters, still blaming the EU. Even though it was Brois who suggested the current NI protocol (at the time the EU were happy with Mays plan)
 

Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Got love brexiters, still blaming the EU. Even though it was Brois who suggested the current NI protocol (at the time the EU were happy with Mays plan)
Got a bit of ham from tesco chilled cabinet last night for my pack up today - dicing with death I told the check out lass. Dicing with death.

I noticed the East Europeans on the spud grading line now do not eat chilled meat products from Tesco in Holbeach - they have had emails from back home in EU land telling them it is not safe in the UK. One Lithuanian lad showed me the official EU email - safe until June 30th then that is it - any UK chilled product is designed to kill EU nationals. The lad was taking it seriously and he is now only buying chilled meats from the umpteen Eastern European grocery shops in Grantham. And his mum is sending him chilled meats direct from Lithuania.
 
Got love brexiters, still blaming the EU. Even though it was Brois who suggested the current NI protocol (at the time the EU were happy with Mays plan)
of course they were, that tie the whole of the uk to the eu until the eu decided different i cant imagine that would ever have happened,especially as uk has to be seen to suffer for leaving
 
Undefined border?
"The stark reality of the Irish Border is that it was never intended to be an international boundary. What began as an idea for a temporary demarcation line between two devolved United Kingdom parliaments evolved into something much more significant.
It has seen customs posts, cratering, spiking, checkpoints, and militarisation over its lifetime. The Irish Border has never been “softer” than it is at the present moment. Equally, there has never been such uncertainty over what the future holds in its chequered history."
Dr Conor Mulvagh is a lecturer in Irish history at University College Dublin

 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
Doesn’t a Freeport have to have some sort of delineation with access controls? The GFA would preclude that, I think.

Also, you seem to conveniently forget goods going in the opposite direction too - the system would need to be acceptable to all parties.
You have delineation its the whole of NI becomes a freeport and not affected by GFA as still free movement in and out of NI. As for forgetting goods in opposite direction I already covered that in response to your previous statement at post 55. You just need to read it.
 

HatsOff

Member
Mixed Farmer
The concept of Freeports get thrown around, but they aren't a panacea. They've been going in and out of fashion over the decades.

We could have had them as EU members (indeed there are many within the EU at the moment), they're only being discussed now in the hope they could make up the potential lost trade due to non-tariff barriers we now face, but that is very unlikely as their impact isn't that massive.
 
The concept of Freeports get thrown around, but they aren't a panacea. They've been going in and out of fashion over the decades.

We could have had them as EU members (indeed there are many within the EU at the moment), they're only being discussed now in the hope they could make up the potential lost trade due to non-tariff barriers we now face, but that is very unlikely as their impact isn't that massive.
freeports are very limited within the eu though, we have had and still do a massive trade imbalance with the eu which was growing since we joined,it surely makes sense to prioritise trade with the rest of the world where theres growth
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
The concept of Freeports get thrown around, but they aren't a panacea. They've been going in and out of fashion over the decades.

We could have had them as EU members (indeed there are many within the EU at the moment), they're only being discussed now in the hope they could make up the potential lost trade due to non-tariff barriers we now face, but that is very unlikely as their impact isn't that massive.
But as a solution to the NI problem its far better than the current mess and would solve the problem without breaking the GFA of free movement between ROI and NI.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
freeports are very limited within the eu though, we have had and still do a massive trade imbalance with the eu which was growing since we joined,it surely makes sense to prioritise trade with the rest of the world where theres growth
But I am talking of the whole of NI being a freeport which gets over the problem of imports from EU and UK. As well as exports conforming to EU or UK rules depending or were your exporting to.
 
But as a solution to the NI problem its far better than the current mess and would solve the problem without breaking the GFA of free movement between ROI and NI.
i wouldnt know about that ,what it really requires is both sides to be serious about ensuring smooth flow of goods between ni and rest of uk ,but its unlikely to happen soon as eu is trying to make life as hard as possible to show leaving the eu is a mistake
 

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
They will fail.
It is not clear what is “really” happening. The remainers are saying “this is what you signed up for” but what is being debated now is the spirit of the agreement. Within that is a can of worms as the EU are not going to make many of any concessions as they of course want to prove the UK wrong for leaving. Therefore I can understand our administrations position not to cave in and ultimately head off towards a Theresa May deal. Her deal was “remain” in all but words. The fact is the UK decided to leave and the EU don’t like it at all. This situation is going to run and run. Sadly it’s all down to a few humans on both sides which affects the rest of us.
 

nivilla1982

Member
Livestock Farmer
"The stark reality of the Irish Border is that it was never intended to be an international boundary. What began as an idea for a temporary demarcation line between two devolved United Kingdom parliaments evolved into something much more significant.
It has seen customs posts, cratering, spiking, checkpoints, and militarisation over its lifetime. The Irish Border has never been “softer” than it is at the present moment. Equally, there has never been such uncertainty over what the future holds in its chequered history."
Dr Conor Mulvagh is a lecturer in Irish history at University College Dublin

It may not have been intended to be an international border, but it is.
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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