European Countries Winter oilseed rape yield data sources?

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
Out of interest, I have been trying to find historical , winter oilseed rape yield data from European countries , on the internet with out much success.
Any suggestions how I might find the information would be useful?
If any particular countries average rape yields are consistently above the UK average, it would be interesting to find out the reasons why.
Thanks
 

ConanPB

Member
Out of interest, I have been trying to find historical , winter oilseed rape yield data from European countries , on the internet with out much success.
Any suggestions how I might find the information would be useful?
If any particular countries average rape yields are consistently above the UK average, it would be interesting to find out the reasons why.
Thanks
Remember asking this question at a Hutchinsons meeting. Why do we seem to suffer CSFB beetle more than other countries. Didn't get very clear answers, but it was said that places such as Germany tend to get colder winters than us and this possibly sorts the larvae. Historically the Germans got higher yields than us, again a side effect of the colder temperatures as long as they got adequate snow cover.
 
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MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
Remember asking this question at a Hutchinsons meeting. Why do we seem to suffer CSFB beetle more than other countries. Didn't get very clear answers, but it was said that places such as Germany tend to get colder winters than us and this possibly sorts the larvae. Historically the Germans got higher yields than us, again a side effect of the colder temperatures as long as they got adequate snow cover.
Is Germany’s climate also more conducive to higher cereal yields, and that is why the Schleswig Holstein system of growing combinable crops was promoted by BASF, back in the 1980’s/90’s.?
 

CORK

Member
Is Germany’s climate also more conducive to higher cereal yields, and that is why the Schleswig Holstein system of growing combinable crops was promoted by BASF, back in the 1980’s/90’s.?
The climate in Germany must suit it but I think they are very good at growing it too.
The fact that there are breeding programmes in Germany must help too. The U.K. has some breeding too of course.
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
Denmark looks to achieve very good yields . It would be good to hear from any Danish TFF members about growing rape in Denmark.
Perhaps @Knud may be able to comment
 
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Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Ask the trade and they will tell you that we don't spend enough on our osr crops!

Don't forget that many of them had the derogation for neonic seed dressings that we didn't. CSFB isn't a British phenomenon.
 
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CORK

Member
I think the tight rotations & cropping density has been a very significant factor in the U.K.
I’m involved in trials in Ireland and I’ve always noticed how infrequent WOSR cropping in a rotation helps WOSR yield and how separation from last years WOSR stubble has a massive effect on light leaf spot (and Phoma) incidence.
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
I think the tight rotations & cropping density has been a very significant factor in the U.K.
I’m involved in trials in Ireland and I’ve always noticed how infrequent WOSR cropping in a rotation helps WOSR yield and how separation from last years WOSR stubble has a massive effect on light leaf spot (and Phoma) incidence.
How long would your definition of “ infrequent WOSR cropping in a rotation helps WOSR yield”,be?
 

CORK

Member
How long would your definition of “ infrequent WOSR cropping in a rotation helps WOSR yield”,be?
I would suggest that any closer than 1 in 5 would a negative. This is based on a couple of rotations that I am using. It is also based on my sketchy memory of a NIAB course that I attended some years ago.
I think the % yield penalty was quite small once you went out to 1 year in 5.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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