Extending House, Please Explain....

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
....what to do first.

Get builder round, get architect rung up, have chat with structural engineer?

Or book them all for the same day, tell them what I want, get them to sort out what I can have while making it pretty?

Every story I've ever heard about builders is an itinerary of their bullshittery.
 

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
Design and plan it yourself first, do a few drawings, throw a few ideas about, visit other extensions, look on others on internet etc. Have a clear idea of what you want before anyone starts telling you how to do it. Decide on size, rough layout, window and glass sizing and design etc.

Even mark it out on ground with spray paint, stand there and try to envisage it. It will be most important bit that you do. Do it your way not what others say, you have to live with it even if it costs a bit more or is more hassle.
 

Jimdog1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
I would agree with br. Have a firm idea written down of what you want to achieve by building extension - might sound obvious but will perhaps help architect to get a good start after site visit. Use an architect that is familiar with your local planners.
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
....what to do first.

Get builder round, get architect rung up, have chat with structural engineer?

Or book them all for the same day, tell them what I want, get them to sort out what I can have while making it pretty?

Every story I've ever heard about builders is an itinerary of their bullshittery.

your own sketch and ideas then architect first (who will work with structural engineer) - then budget (use a QS if unsure) then planning - then out to tender with builders
 
Architect first ,budget next ,get planning worry about the builder a structural bit after gaining planning ,2000 a sqm for basic build dependant on where you are ,
I think a good architect can make a silk purse out of a sows ear, but I would say, go and visit other extensions before seeing the architect to get ideas too (I wish our architect had mentioned there is no storage in the attic without using either attic trusses or cutting the roof, which in the scheme of things would have cost very little extra). It is also possible to design in ways that make the actual construction costs cheaper too.
 

Jimdog1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
your own sketch and ideas then architect first (who will work with structural engineer) - then budget (use a QS if unsure) then planning - then out to tender with builders
Tender not always the cheapest way but depends how much you are going to get involved yourself. Tender is probably going to involve a minor works contract - fine on a new build but on an extension where you may be uncertain of the structure of your existing building you may find you have deviate from the plans. This will involve the architect re-drawing parts and your builder quoting for these alterations mid build. This is when you can find yourself in a money pit. With the right builder and you firmly in charge, paying on a hourly or day rate can work out fine.
 
1st job is dealing with the bloody planners. What you may think is a perfectly reasonable extension is sure to be at odds with some national or local policy or just the wim of a planning officer.

Careful you don`t waste of money on design fees if the planners is going to refuse.
A decent architect should have an idea what will be acceptable but it`s not an exact science
 
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chaffcutter

Moderator
Arable Farmer
Location
S. Staffs
My sil had been promised a big spend on a very basic farmhouse when the farm mortgage was paid off. We all had ideas for what could be done nicely, but they got an architect in with imagination, he basically turned the house through 180 degrees with a new staircase, it was amazing the difference it made!

Trouble is finding such an architect, need to speak to local planning consultants for recs I would guess.
 
1st job is dealing with the bloody planners. What you may think is a perfectly reasonable extension is sure to be at odds with some national or local policy or just the wim of a planning officer.

Careful you don`t waste of money on design fees if the planners is going to refuse.
A decent architect should have an idea what will be acceptable but it`s not an exact science
Planning is your first hurdle so you need to understand what is possible under local and national planning policy.
Architects have some idea but we are finding increasingly that they are getting lost in the nuance of planning and are submitting applications which fall foul of local policies they were not aware of - we now preparing planning briefs for several architects practices prior to them undertaking design work.
 

TheTallGuy

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
Be wary of getting an architect to design anything without having a structural engineer involved at the start. An acquaintance had architects design an extension that was submitted and approved for planning. When the structural engineers got involved it turned out that the only way to achieve the approved design would involve ripping the whole rear wall off of a mid terrace house because the existing structure & layout wasn't strong enough. The level of work required would also require shoring and underpinning of the adjacent properties. The structural engineer was able to sketch out a more practical design, but that required another planning application to be made...
 
All about pre planning meetings, chats and money to planning authorities now alledgely?
Pre-Apps for extensions are a bit overkill unless you are looking to push the limits of the Planning Policy.
Householder planning application is £206 but don't expect any communication from the case officer once the application is in - those days have sailed and COVID is the current excuse.
And don't expect any lieniency when it comes to the information required - it all needs to be provided up front - if something is missing they will not validate the application.
 

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