Extra costs for pedigree bulls

how much extra to produce and sell a pedigree bull V commercial steer at 18 months ?

  • under £100

  • £100 to £250

  • £251 to £500

  • £501 to £1000

  • £1001 to £2000

  • over £2000


Results are only viewable after voting.

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Agree with you on that.we bought a bull last year that the breeder had sold to a guy.who then sent him back as he'd had him tested an said he was infertile.I took a chance ,every cow in calf .

Plenty people will sell bulls cheap.just bought one for 2k would of been more but he's ripped his nose ring out.also chance at a good limmy bull for 2k but I've no room for it.

Are the breeders making money at that? I very much doubt it.
We would be but as above the thread is not about sale price but costs and if they are necessary.

It seems to me that there are a lot of parasites that feed of farmers as they sell goods/services that are not necessarily.
Looking at the way things are likely to tighten up given the way things are going (loss of subs being the main one) then these unnecessary costs need to be cut out
 

cows r us

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Buckinghamshire
[/QUOTE]
There is a funny mind set in this country, indicated by this thread's title which suggests that it has to be extra to produce a bull.
I'm still waiting for an option to say it can be less.
It can't be less. You can can have a commercial bull and a pedigree bull and treat them exactly the same all the way through. Spend the same amount. You will still have too register the pedegree bull though. So I guess that cost of registration is the absolute minimum cost difference between the two. The maximum cost difference is as long as a piece of orange baler twine.
 
It can't be less. You can can have a commercial bull and a pedigree bull and treat them exactly the same all the way through. Spend the same amount. You will still have too register the pedegree bull though. So I guess that cost of registration is the absolute minimum cost difference between the two. The maximum cost difference is as long as a piece of orange baler twine.
It's important that we keep our minds open
Who says you have to treat them the same?

Why would a young bull need kept like a commercial animal.

Any fattening bullocks I've had will have more feeding than a group of young bulls that run out all winter on store ration and grass only in their 2nd summer until they are sold at 16 to 18 months.
Fat bullocks at the same age will have eaten more than Reg cost extra.
 

Matt

Member
If you mostly agree does that mean you think its mostly a waste of time and money.
Could it be slightly counterproductive in the the extra handling/stress for the bull could make him more likely to go infertile?
If a bull got so wound up and stressed at the sight of been handled then i need to have a good look at what we are doing with our cattle.
Our vets wouldn't be recommending it if there was issues with doing it.

i mostly agree that it just shows what they are on that day, but is no guarantee of the success of the bull. that is more down to how he is looked after when he is introduced to ladies.

i've known some people 'throw' a 2 year old bull out with 50 cows out on old pasture and wonder why he struggles to get round them all in time, basically spoilt the bull in a matter of months.
so how would the breeder mitigate against that situation? The only real way is semen sample, as what else can breeder do? hence the extra cost when really could do with a older bull having the majority to let the new boy find the target. as no doubt he is all enthusiasm and no technique to start with.
 

Matt

Member
It can't be less. You can can have a commercial bull and a pedigree bull and treat them exactly the same all the way through. Spend the same amount. You will still have too register the pedegree bull though. So I guess that cost of registration is the absolute minimum cost difference between the two. The maximum cost difference is as long as a piece of orange baler twine.
our commercial bulls have bagged feed to push them on. bulls we select for future breeders dont. but are here longer, on forage and mins.

the animals you sell for breeding, have to pay for the society fees and anything over commercial costs other wise you are giving money away.
 

Agrivator

Member
What about rings in bulls noses if it's going direct to farm and the bull isn't halter trained. Necessary or unnecessary?
Unnecessary unless it's an aggressive sort. But that might make the seller liable if it hurts someone - just as does a warning sign -'dangerous bull or dog or wife''

It also means the bull might associate a crush or a man with straw in his mouth and a funny hat, as some sort of foe.
 

Gulli

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Somerset
If a bull got so wound up and stressed at the sight of been handled then i need to have a good look at what we are doing with our cattle.
Our vets wouldn't be recommending it if there was issues with doing it.

i mostly agree that it just shows what they are on that day, but is no guarantee of the success of the bull. that is more down to how he is looked after when he is introduced to ladies.

i've known some people 'throw' a 2 year old bull out with 50 cows out on old pasture and wonder why he struggles to get round them all in time, basically spoilt the bull in a matter of months.
so how would the breeder mitigate against that situation? The only real way is semen sample, as what else can breeder do? hence the extra cost when really could do with a older bull having the majority to let the new boy find the target. as no doubt he is all enthusiasm and no technique to start with.
Can a 2 year old bull not serve 50 cows?
 

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