Fallen tree on boundary

I have two fallen trees on boundaries with neighbours, one out of neighbours hedge into my field and one out of my hedge into a different neighbours field.

Which one am I responsible for cleaning?
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
you are certainly responsible for your trees. so it is up to you to clear the one that has fallen on to the neighbours.
As others say I would start by negotiating. You are not neccesarily responsible for any damage but it is neighbourly to repair damaged fences
 

Alias

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Lancashire
Our neighbour’s tree fell into our field. I half fancied it for firewood and was going to ring him but he rang me first to see if I wanted any of it. I said well it’s your tree so if you want it then you take it. He had it sawn up and thrown into a pile on his side the same day, job sorted. 👍
We had a ditch running over. It was on our side of the fence but would have officially been his. I was down with the digger one day so I cleaned it out, only 30-40 yard. He saw what I had done and left me 5 gallon of diesel for my troubles.
We might only speak once or twice a year, but if you can work with each other it makes a world of difference to stress levels.
 
Isn't it where it falls, it lies, so you take the one that lies to you?
I sort of thought that might be the case, overhanging branches belong to the tree owner, the owner of the land they overhang can cut them back but should offer the timber to the owner.
It was my understanding that if a branch broke off a tree however the landowner who’s land it fell on could claim it as there’s.
If that’s right I was wondering if the same applies to a whole tree.
 
I take it you have a few issues with neighbour to be asking. Around here tree would be cleared, ringed and logged within days!!!
As far as issues with neighbours goes, no and not really, it’s two different neighbours.
First tree blew down around about 12 months ago into my field, it’s a grazing field so hasn’t made too much difference, neighbour hasn’t been to saw it up and I haven’t had chance, I will saw it up one day if he doesn’t beat me to it, it may take a while, no dramas either way about who does it as far as I’m concerned.

Other tree blew down in storm Arwen, the owners of the field live in town somewhere, the land was part of a small holding that they used to live at but never farmed. They sold the house, buildings and a few acres a few years back when they moved into town and carried on renting the land out. I can’t see them wanting or being able to do anything about the tree themselves. I’ve never had a lot to do with them as neighbours other than exchanging pleasantries and to that end have got on fine but have kept my distance as “she “ has a bit of a reputation for falling out with a couple of neighbours in houses across the toad from them.
Last spring they put the land on the market for sale privately. I have submitted several bids for the land, each time being topped by a mystery bidder but pulled out in the autumn when my last bid was topped. Not sure what the current situation is but I suspect the other bidder was the auctioneer/owner.
It’s wet ground, taking any tractors/machinery there until late spring depending on weather is going to make a right mess which I can’t see going down well . Easiest solution would have been if they’d sold me the land, it’s crap timber so I’d have cut into lengths and burnt on the spot as the field is infested with thistles, docks and nettles so wants ploughing.

As I say I can’t see them clearing it and was unsure what the legal position is, especially if i have to clear it and due to the wet nature of the land make a mess which is almost inevitable if it’s to be cleared before the grass starts growing in ernest or will make a mess in the growing grass.
It looks like a bit of a no win situation for me unless it’s not legally my responsibility
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
My understanding:
Tree belongs to whoever owns the land it was growing on. The land owner where it falls can chop it up and offer to return if the tree owner wants it, or presumably compel the tree owner to tidy up their property and remove the woodland. I’d expect the tree owner to repair the boundary fence if damaged.

For your situation, I’d offer the first tree owner an opportunity to recover their property, then tidy it and keep if they decline. I’d also offer the second folks the use of the wood and hope they take it, but if not make it clear you’ll be using their land for access to recover if not.
 

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
As far as issues with neighbours goes, no and not really, it’s two different neighbours.
First tree blew down around about 12 months ago into my field, it’s a grazing field so hasn’t made too much difference, neighbour hasn’t been to saw it up and I haven’t had chance, I will saw it up one day if he doesn’t beat me to it, it may take a while, no dramas either way about who does it as far as I’m concerned.

Other tree blew down in storm Arwen, the owners of the field live in town somewhere, the land was part of a small holding that they used to live at but never farmed. They sold the house, buildings and a few acres a few years back when they moved into town and carried on renting the land out. I can’t see them wanting or being able to do anything about the tree themselves. I’ve never had a lot to do with them as neighbours other than exchanging pleasantries and to that end have got on fine but have kept my distance as “she “ has a bit of a reputation for falling out with a couple of neighbours in houses across the toad from them.
Last spring they put the land on the market for sale privately. I have submitted several bids for the land, each time being topped by a mystery bidder but pulled out in the autumn when my last bid was topped. Not sure what the current situation is but I suspect the other bidder was the auctioneer/owner.
It’s wet ground, taking any tractors/machinery there until late spring depending on weather is going to make a right mess which I can’t see going down well . Easiest solution would have been if they’d sold me the land, it’s crap timber so I’d have cut into lengths and burnt on the spot as the field is infested with thistles, docks and nettles so wants ploughing.

As I say I can’t see them clearing it and was unsure what the legal position is, especially if i have to clear it and due to the wet nature of the land make a mess which is almost inevitable if it’s to be cleared before the grass starts growing in ernest or will make a mess in the growing grass.
It looks like a bit of a no win situation for me unless it’s not legally my responsibility
In that instance we would just cut in and lob it to one side with digger to get it off fence etc and if still there in twelve months it will be seasoned and logged up
 
Location
Ceredigion
Massive Tree came down in the storm here , Niebours Tree that came down into my field , did not notice it for a few days , but he calls over to apologize for not moving it , but I could see it was just to much for him , he only had a small saw , anyhow I popped over with the excavator and by big saw and cut it into lenghts and lifted it over the fence into his field , he was well pleased , nice to have niebours you can work with
 
Our neighbour’s tree fell into our field. I half fancied it for firewood and was going to ring him but he rang me first to see if I wanted any of it. I said well it’s your tree so if you want it then you take it. He had it sawn up and thrown into a pile on his side the same day, job sorted. 👍
We had a ditch running over. It was on our side of the fence but would have officially been his. I was down with the digger one day so I cleaned it out, only 30-40 yard. He saw what I had done and left me 5 gallon of diesel for my troubles.
We might only speak once or twice a year, but if you can work with each other it makes a world of difference to stress levels.

No need to brag! Good for you though.

Some one around here hasn't dug out their brook as long as I can remember.

Landowners upstream keep doing it
 

Cowcorn

Member
Mixed Farmer
As far as issues with neighbours goes, no and not really, it’s two different neighbours.
First tree blew down around about 12 months ago into my field, it’s a grazing field so hasn’t made too much difference, neighbour hasn’t been to saw it up and I haven’t had chance, I will saw it up one day if he doesn’t beat me to it, it may take a while, no dramas either way about who does it as far as I’m concerned.

Other tree blew down in storm Arwen, the owners of the field live in town somewhere, the land was part of a small holding that they used to live at but never farmed. They sold the house, buildings and a few acres a few years back when they moved into town and carried on renting the land out. I can’t see them wanting or being able to do anything about the tree themselves. I’ve never had a lot to do with them as neighbours other than exchanging pleasantries and to that end have got on fine but have kept my distance as “she “ has a bit of a reputation for falling out with a couple of neighbours in houses across the toad from them.
Last spring they put the land on the market for sale privately. I have submitted several bids for the land, each time being topped by a mystery bidder but pulled out in the autumn when my last bid was topped. Not sure what the current situation is but I suspect the other bidder was the auctioneer/owner.
It’s wet ground, taking any tractors/machinery there until late spring depending on weather is going to make a right mess which I can’t see going down well . Easiest solution would have been if they’d sold me the land, it’s crap timber so I’d have cut into lengths and burnt on the spot as the field is infested with thistles, docks and nettles so wants ploughing.

As I say I can’t see them clearing it and was unsure what the legal position is, especially if i have to clear it and due to the wet nature of the land make a mess which is almost inevitable if it’s to be cleared before the grass starts growing in ernest or will make a mess in the growing grass.
It looks like a bit of a no win situation for me unless it’s not legally my responsibility
Mmm hard to know whats going on with the land ... Bit of the same with me on 13 acres thats in a terrible state after 30 odd years in the grasp of the horsey crowd . Been trying to buy it for the last year but every bid i put on gets topped by a mystery bidder . Enquiries have failed to flush out the bidders identity so like you i have concluded theres a " puffer " on the job .
Have now decided to play it " long " and see what happens .
Last bid i put on was a nice round figure so if its topped the can keep it .
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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