Farmer BASIS

Meallydave

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Black Isle
Hi all

just wondering how many farmers on here have done their BASIS?

Is it easy enough to do and worthwhile doing? My current agronomist is planning on retiring soon and I just thought it’s something I could do. It can’t be that difficult can it?

My agronomist tells me that he needs to collect points every year. Is that something I would need to do as well?

Ta
 

eagleye

Member
Location
co down
a lot of weed identification, disease identification etc when I did it. Plus a project.
However you still need experience to get the best from chemicals, integrated pest management, nutrition etc.
access to trials data is important and keeping up to date with resistance in pests, weeds and diseases. Not just so easy as passing BASIS and away you go as an expert, but its a good start.
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
If you are interested in your crops, know your 'fops' from your 'azoles', and are prepared to learn, then go for it.
I think if you have a reasonable background knowledge then it shouldn't be too difficult. You will have to go to a reasonable number of field days, conferences and courses to keep up the CPD points, probably 10 half day events. Many farmers with BASIS are also members of NIAB/TAG, who are a good source of info and PD points.
I could be cynical and say that you just have to read the label, but there is a lot more to it than that. Its a bit like a driving test - pass your test, then you can learn to drive.
Lots of farmers and farm managers have done it.
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
What does your agronomist cost? £4 acre.
Cost is only part of it, its about having the interest to want to grow a cost effective crop, and perhaps make better decisions for the management of the whole business etc etc.
You will need to find time to go crop walking as well. If you have dogs that is no problem, but seriously if you don't do that already then don't bother with BASIS, just get another agronomist.
 

Longneck

Member
But as I understand it, you only have to keep up with points to stay on the register. If you are not planning on selling your service and just doing your own agronomy then just get the qualification and join NIAB to keep yourself up to date.
 

T Hectares

Member
Location
Berkshire
Another vote for BASIS + NIAB
It’s important to get another view and to keep up to date with new products etc, NIAB helps with this and accumulating points, I’ve missed the field days not happening, although we have had zoom meetings it’s not the same as getting out in the field
The farm received a grant of around half the cost of BASIS when I did mine, not sure if anything is around at the moment
 

e3120

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Northumberland
But as I understand it, you only have to keep up with points to stay on the register. If you are not planning on selling your service and just doing your own agronomy then just get the qualification and join NIAB to keep yourself up to date.
Practically, yes, but is that enough to satisfy RT? If you put your basis no down, they'll revel in finding it's expired. Maybe best not to quote it and insist you do your own, lay, agronomy, if that's still acceptable.
 

Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
I did BASIS a few years ago when there was funding for it. I didn’t find it easy but really enjoyed it and passed. It was worth the effort and I have always felt it improved my understanding.

I never had any intention of doing all my own agronomy and have always had an independent agronomist. I just don’t have the time to keep up with everything and like a different set of eyes looking at my crops.

These days I am just a farmer member so don’t need as many points. But I do try to get as many as I can

I would always say to somebody, if you have the inclination to do basis you won’t regret it

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Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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