Farmer Roy's Random Thoughts - I never said it was easy.

Crofter64

Member
Location
Eastern Canada
Bullshyte
The accident of birth is where 90% of your luck is made or not whether you will inherit wealth or a slum hole in calcutta
I would argue that it’s not so much where you were born but how much character and pluck you have . Inherited wealth is a mixed blessing and doesn’t seem to bring as much happiness as you’d imagine. Even in farming. A friend of mine gave his son 50% ownership of the farm when the boy was around 22. He went from weekly salary to owning a million dollar plus operation and his spending went through the roof-machinery they don’t need, registered cows rather than commercial. the list is endless The father can’t retire as planned ‘cause the son can’t cope with the expanded farm alone, and pretty soon theyare going to lose this farm to the debt burden created by the son and his non- working spendthrift wife. Too much, too soon, too easy.too sad.
 
Last edited:
Geez, what is it with people being jealous of others foresight to multi task, invest etc...

Is trying to get a little grip on the adverse pressures we all face through diversification really so bad if it can generate the alleged passive income 🤔

To me, people who bitch about it through nothing more than jealousy, should IMHO, stop moaning about it - get off their arses and do something about it for themselves like others are / have been doing in order to have this.

None of us are born closed books, but you can allow yourself to be if one choses - some however, look beyond today and try to make things happen for themselves in the future, which to me is the difference between leaders and followers.

If you are in any job and cannot make it pay what you desire, either step out or change your direction and add some diversification - then you can have the same benefits as others - but it is a choice.
Screenshot_20190912-082955_Chrome.jpg
 
Why would you feed a dog cereals?
To make them fat or unhealthy, I guess - seems to work well for people and cattle in that respect, so why not their dogs as well?

Gives the vets something to do...

The best working dog tucker around is possum, followed closely by ram mutton - sh!t it makes them shine, and maintain good condition while working hard.
 

Samcowman

Member
Location
Wiltshire
To make them fat or unhealthy, I guess - seems to work well for people and cattle in that respect, so why not their dogs as well?

Gives the vets something to do...

The best working dog tucker around is possum, followed closely by ram mutton - sh!t it makes them shine, and maintain good condition while working hard.
When the OH was a kid back home in nz. Her old man had cut up some possum to give to the cats and left it in the fridge. Mother in law thought it was rabbit and cooked it up for tea. Didn’t do her any harm!!!!!
 
When the OH was a kid back home in nz. Her old man had cut up some possum to give to the cats and left it in the fridge. Mother in law thought it was rabbit and cooked it up for tea. Didn’t do her any harm!!!!!
You can definitely tell the difference between rabbit and possum - but I'd not turn down either. :hungry:
I've spotted a rabbit down the back of the farm that's a good size for the roasting dish, it maybe a job for the pea-rifle this weekend actually.
 
A little more clinical than that!
Smack between the ears and you don't waste meat (y) a young hare is also pretty good, I must confess I have oven bags for game as it's so much easier to cook to perfection in a bag, for me.
Alas, this year I have bulls eating the grass so the hares are mostly on the dairy over the back fence, just one rank old buck AFAIK. Hence the rabbits are about :hungry:

Getting a bit of growth now, especially the clover is starting to move with a couple of brighter days this week.
Today has been all about "small flags extended" and bright, spring sunshine 😎
 

Forum statistics

Threads
158,211
Messages
3,615,238
Members
39,955
Latest member
Gerald

Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

  • 46
  • 0


Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

Written by Freya Herring

Dairy farmers cash in on a growing trend to replace both homogenisation and plastic with a revival of the traditional ways
“When the milk price crashed five years ago, we were in a bad...
Top