Farmer Roy's Random Thoughts - I never said it was easy.

the irony of growing a crop that is used for direct human consumption ( mung beans ), either as fresh sprouts, or canned, or is processed into a high protein flour for dahl & other human food products, or is now finding its way into "fake meats" due to its protein levels - in ALL its forms & end products suitable for & bought by vegans - when you consider I am killing 100's of 1000's or even 1'000'000's of sentient mammals, to grow that crop . . .
 
Biological/animal N for your vegan crop 😀
just think of the biological activity from all those little rotting carcasses. They even have the courtesy to go back into their burrows to die

grass always grows better where a sheep / cow carcass rotted away




i remember a mate of mine telling his agronomist years ago he wanted a bag of fert that was as good as a dead sheep at making his grass grow :ROFLMAO:
 
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Kidds

Member
Horticulture
If it was in the UK there wouldn't be any bodies because you would never be allowed to poison by plane, not convinced we have an effective enough poison and if we do nobody has a license to buy more than 1kg at a time, even if they did the stuff probably comes from Europe and is stuck at a port somewhere abroad while paperwork is filed, then the illegal stowaways would eat it on route causing even more delay and if by some miracle the poison did reach a farm ready to be spread the animal rights loons would be picketing the fields.
Ask anybody on here how close to reality that lot actually is.
 
If it was in the UK there wouldn't be any bodies because you would never be allowed to poison by plane, not convinced we have an effective enough poison and if we do nobody has a license to buy more than 1kg at a time, even if they did the stuff probably comes from Europe and is stuck at a port somewhere abroad while paperwork is filed, then the illegal stowaways would eat it on route causing even more delay and if by some miracle the poison did reach a farm ready to be spread the animal rights loons would be picketing the fields.
Ask anybody on here how close to reality that lot actually is.
the zinc phosphide is different to the anti coagulant poisons

not allowed to use ZP around buildings etc, not allowed to use anti coagulants in crops / fields - but yes, i do get your point
 
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If it was in the UK there wouldn't be any bodies because you would never be allowed to poison by plane, not convinced we have an effective enough poison and if we do nobody has a license to buy more than 1kg at a time, even if they did the stuff probably comes from Europe and is stuck at a port somewhere abroad while paperwork is filed, then the illegal stowaways would eat it on route causing even more delay and if by some miracle the poison did reach a farm ready to be spread the animal rights loons would be picketing the fields.
Ask anybody on here how close to reality that lot actually is.
a license to buy 1kg 😮

I bought an 8kg bucket JUST to bait my house. Walked into a rural supplies shop & picked it up off the shelf. No paperwork, anyone can do it.
Go into any of our grocery / supermarkets & you can buy 350g boxes of mouse bait ( no limit ), along with your bread, milk & veggies . . .
Normal hardware shops you can easily buy at least 5kg buckets off the shelf . . .

I’ve used over half of this 8 kg bucket JUST around / in my house in maybe a couple of months ?

having said that, we DO have agricultural chemicals that ARE stored under lock & key & you do require the correct documentation to purchase AND transport them . . .
but not mouse bait
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Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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