Farming Start-Up

Discussion in 'Pig and Poultry' started by FarmingJourney, Mar 16, 2019.

  1. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Hi,

    From reading a vast amount of information online it seems that trying to venture into farming at a young age seems to be near impossible. Many people have put across negatives views about it. My question is, for someone that has a small holding (5-10 acres of land) what would be the best way to get into farming? Is there a particular area, ie poultry, that would be a good place to start?

    Thanks,
     
    spin cycle likes this.
  2. Still Farming

    Still Farming Member

    Location:
    Glamorgan Wales
    Welcome.
    Touch on something you like and can try and turn a few bob .
    Location,soil type, orientation etc may help.
     
    spin cycle likes this.
  3. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Thank you for your response - we're based in Suffolk so a lot of the land around here is used for crops, same as in Norfolk really but would much prefer to be doing something with livestock
     
    Still Farming likes this.
  4. Wink

    Wink Member

    Location:
    Hampshire
    To have a small holding as a base I reckon your in a great position. Just somewhere to store kit, feed, stock etc. You can do a lot with what you have already and build from there. A house on site, even better.
     
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  5. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    okay, thank you! So just gradually add things over time and learn from the experience as we go?
     
  6. spin cycle

    spin cycle Member

    Location:
    north norfolk
    i went on a visit to see a sheep farmer who had 2000 ewes...he owned just 17 ac.....so 5-10ac could be a decent base for livestock enterprise on grass lets....or veg to sell locally....or poultry

    good luck anyhow:)
     
    Wink likes this.
  7. Rossymons

    Rossymons Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    If youre surrounded by cropping why not look at beimg a gypsy shepherd and suggesting to using your sheep as a breakcrop?

    Youre smallholding is a perfect place to store all the kit you need as well as animals that need attention.
     
    Will Wilson, Greenbeast, Wink and 3 others like this.
  8. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Yeah that's what I was thinking, we could certainly add some veg and poultry to sell locally as well :)
     
  9. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Im not sure what that term means but do you mean like leasing out the sheep to help maintain their land?
    So you could grow the herd without having to buy more land?
     
  10. Rossymons

    Rossymons Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    If they included things like grass, turnips, whate er else a sheep might eat into their rotations as a break crop.

    They get some organic matter back in their soil, you get extra acres to eat.

    I worry I might have made it seem simplistic but I know its been done before so no reason it cant be done again.
     
    multi power likes this.
  11. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Okay that makes sense, thank you! It's something we can look into, there are a few farmers around here I could speak with
     
  12. snarling bee

    snarling bee Member

    Location:
    Bedford
    Certain parts of the country grazing can be had for almost nothing. If you are in one of those areas then go for it. Don't underestimate the time and expense of travelling though.
     
    JP1 likes this.
  13. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Yes that's true, something we'll need to work out for sure. Thank you!
     
  14. Rossymons

    Rossymons Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Dont under estimate the amount of fencing equipment either
     
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  15. Rossymons

    Rossymons Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
  16. unlacedgecko

    unlacedgecko Member

    Location:
    North Lincolnshire
    Thanks for the tag.

    OP you are ideally placed to run a sheep enterprise integrated into arable cropping.

    You will need;

    A mobile handling system
    Large amount of electric fencing (Rappa is my preference due to speed)
    A good dog (or two)

    A quad to put up and take down the fencing will also help a lot.

    The ability to buy all the above without finance will help enormously in the uncertain times ahead.

    The key will be your interpersonal skills and your ability to forge solid relationshisr with your landowners.

    To get sheep on the ground without buying them, look at contract grazing other people's stock. But your relationship with landowners will be the absolute key.

    (Contract grazed sheep can be substituted for dairy heifers as TB shouldn't be an issue).
     
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  17. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Yeah we have been looking into ways of cutting our cost with fencing but at the moment it's one of the bigger expenses
     
  18. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    That's great thank you! I assume you mean sheepdogs to help with the work of rounding up the sheep?

    And then through that start building up our own flock of sheep?
     
  19. unlacedgecko

    unlacedgecko Member

    Location:
    North Lincolnshire
    Yes. Unless they are bucket trained, do not attempt to do anything with sheep without a dog.

    I'd be in no hurry to build up a flock of sheep until some political clarity is apparent.
     
  20. FarmingJourney

    FarmingJourney New Member

    Okay thank you! Is there a lot of uncertainty with sheep because of Brexit? In what was is that effecting it?
     

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