Farming without subsidies

Discussion in 'Agricultural Matters' started by Farmer Fin, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. stewart

    stewart Member

    Location:
    Bay of Plenty NZ
    Have we had this conversation before? even if we have what is the harm in re visiting it?
    Were the dairies of the day abusing their position or were farmers of the day incapable of making decisions on their future?
    I tend to go off facts and steer away from emotion and rhetoric, the facts are that the MMB was very poorly run, very inefficient and the main fact is the price increased substantially once they were disbanded, it is a great pity that post vesting day the same old fish heads that could not run the MMB effectively took over to run Milk Marque, a great opportunity was lost.
     
    Farmer Roy likes this.
  2. I don't care if there is any argument for an MMB or not, or if it was an effective organisation or not. I do not see the need for any kind of government enforced price fixing mechanism or quango to regulate the price of bloody milk. It is a completely ridiculous idea. You might as well have a marketing board that sets the retail price of bedside lights. It's mental, not needed.
     
  3. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    It didnt last long though.
    Wiseman offered a penny extra to break the board, and with the help of two or three charlatans they succeeded.
    4 yrs later the price was fecked
     
  4. lazy farmer

    lazy farmer Member

    Location:
    som/dor border
    I tend to live in the present and look to the future. Whilst learning(trying too) from my mistakes.
    This country and its peoples could do worse.
     
  5. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    Bedside lights are a non essential item., which can be stockpiled
    Milk is not, thats a stupid comparison.
    The milk board and the corresponding improvements in its health status played a major part in improving the health of the nation, banishing rickets to the history books.
     
    hally, Canada Farmer and jendan like this.
  6. Come off it. You are dangerously passing down the road of trying to make out milk is some kind of item of national importance. I am afraid to say that many people would quite readily prove it is not.
     
    Farmer Roy likes this.
  7. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    You obviously know nothing about the subject.
    Tb was rife in the 30,s, and milk was one of the methods of spread
    The mmb paid a premium for tb free milk which helped eradicate the disease.
     
    jendan likes this.
  8. unlacedgecko

    unlacedgecko Member

    Location:
    North Lincolnshire
    I though pasteurisation was what stopped tb in milk?
     
    mwj, Brisel, Farmer Roy and 3 others like this.
  9. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    If you had a time machine going back 50yrs
     
  10. Cowcorn

    Cowcorn Member

    Divide and conquer, the oldest trick in the book, wiseman northern milk etc took a lot more than a penny back of their suppliers once the had milk marque on the ropes. And the chance to create a large farmer owned co op was lost .
     
  11. Canada Farmer

    Canada Farmer Member

    Say that in Canada......:facepalm:
     
    FonterraFarmer likes this.
  12. Canada Farmer

    Canada Farmer Member

    Think there be quite a few people who don't realise how hard life was in the 1930's, 40's and even 50's and 60's , fair to say that the current youth don't know how easy they have it or be it too much time and money.
     
    Lili, glasshouse and Cowcorn like this.
  13. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    Thatchers generation have never been taught anything but the free market and dont understand the great good that was done by other methods. Some of which still lives on, eg AHA tenancies
     
    le bon paysan and Cowcorn like this.
  14. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    Some do.
    The bulk of it appears to go to a select few - namely the biggest growers of corn rice soybeans etc

    :scratchhead:

    But the majority get nothing, as far as my understanding goes, it's more of a conduit to get even more money into the big corporations :censored:

    Sorry if it sounds like a conspiracy theory, but that's my impression of their subsidy "system" .
    It's actually more of a corrupt and corrupting system than the CAP.... believe it or not!
     
    lazy farmer and Farmer Roy like this.
  15. stewart

    stewart Member

    Location:
    Bay of Plenty NZ
    The chance to create a farmer owned co op is never lost, it is still there, all it takes is farmers to get together and create the co op.
     
  16. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    And the necessity to do so.

    Hence why most countries pay a little bit of money out, to ensure this isn't necessary enough to be accomplished - as they would suddenly lose their monopoly and control of the producers, keep them working against each other and producing more than they need to... in survival mode instead of thriving.

    "Divide and Conquer".
     
    Cowcorn, digger64, glasshouse and 3 others like this.
  17. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    The bulk of the sub goes to landowners, not farmers.
    Same as the uk
     
    Kiwi Pete likes this.
  18. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    Much of it even bypasses them, if you believe all that you read - one of the best "diversifications" is to recruit a senator onto your board of directors!
    It appears quite a "bent" way of doing it, but ultimately has the effect of keeping the poor in their place and enhancing the position of the well-off.

    I guess it's a classic example of every action having an opposite reaction .
     
    lazy farmer likes this.
  19. Lili

    Lili Member

    I and many others brought up after the last war would have had free school milk. I can only assume that milk was thought of as 'national importance' The MMB was the saving of so many small farms raising standards of herd health, hygiene and a milk cheque every month. The 'man in the bowler hat' gave farmers a chance to improve their stock by having access to quality proven bulls. Do not dismiss so readily things you have no experience of.
     
  20. Y Fan Wen

    Y Fan Wen Member

    Location:
    N W Snowdonia
    Milk 'was' of national importance up to the 70s, the national diet and pay was so poor. Today, obesity is the problem.
    Have a read of 'The Far Country' by Nevil Shute to see the state of the country in 1952.
     

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