Food Processors beg to use Prison Labour

Turnip

Member
A bit of nuance if you actually read the article
To fill vacancies companies are trying to draft in prisoners via a scheme that allows inmates to undertake paid work on day release.
They are looking to recruit prisoners that are eligible for day release which is going to make their transition back into society much easier while also reducing the labor shortage. It is not forced labor.
 

Widgetone

Member
While a practical solution, hardly a great selling point for the meat industry though is it?
Some members of the public may have an issue with the concept of using a reluctant/forced workforce to process their Sunday roast..
 

Bongodog

Member
While a practical solution, hardly a great selling point for the meat industry though is it?
Some members of the public may have an issue with the concept of using a reluctant/forced workforce to process their Sunday roast..
What's the problem, there are many farms and other small businesses with a reluctant/forced workforce, its called working for Dad. I know a few who are nearly 60 still kowtowing to the 90 year old across the yard.
 
Location
Devon
The story is all in the telling.

The food industry is helping rehabilitate and retrain the most disadvantaged in society

or,

Desperate animal killers resort to hiring criminals.

Let's be honest, no matter the wage or 'working conditions', it is work that a huge amount of us would rather not do.
 

GeorgeC1

Member
A bit of nuance if you actually read the article

They are looking to recruit prisoners that are eligible for day release which is going to make their transition back into society much easier while also reducing the labor shortage. It is not forced labor.

On vastly reduced wages I am all in support of prisoner reintroduction schemes but it should not be used to plug labour shortages all that does is make things worse.
 

Turnip

Member
Found an interesting document:

2.7.4 However, prisoners who work for outside employers, doing a normal job (that is, one which cannot be defined as voluntary or charitable work) must be paid the appropriate rate for the job at or above the National Minimum Wage. Where prisoners work for less than the normal working week, they will be paid pro rata. It is Prison Service policy that working out arrangements must not give an unfair competitive advantage to those who employ prisoners and that prisoners must not be treated less favourably than other workers in comparable employment.

So no unfair advantages to those who employ prisoners, wages can't be lower than national minimum wage. This seems to be just focused on expanding the pool of potential employees. Yes there are plenty on the dole if you believe some but they choose not to apply for these jobs and can't be forced so hiring a prisoner seems like a good alternative to having no employee at all. Additionally the prisoner isn't forced, they need to choose to want to do the job so if the employer does not offer a job they would like to do then why would they do it?
 

GeorgeC1

Member
Found an interesting document:



So no unfair advantages to those who employ prisoners, wages can't be lower than national minimum wage. This seems to be just focused on expanding the pool of potential employees. Yes there are plenty on the dole if you believe some but they choose not to apply for these jobs and can't be forced so hiring a prisoner seems like a good alternative to having no employee at all.

God Forbid you offer anything other than NMW with no benefits. No wonder why the locals aren't flocking to these jobs lol.

NMW Hauliers for example will ruin it for non-prisoner haulage drivers who were on £10-£20ph.
 

kfpben

Member
Location
Mid Hampshire
The story is all in the telling.

The food industry is helping rehabilitate and retrain the most disadvantaged in society

or,

Desperate animal killers resort to hiring criminals.

Let's be honest, no matter the wage or 'working conditions', it is work that a huge amount of us would rather not do.
Yet people pay a grand a day to do essentially the same , but dressed in tweed with a gun while they fly overhead!?

Literally everything is in the marketing.
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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