Food Security begins with Farm Security

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
We have recently been introduced to a business called Camor. They are a group of ex-military intelligence officers and police officers who specialise in security and counter terrorism.
Check out their short film here:

We know that the meat industry is a target for food terrorism. We have seen our members be firebombed, their sites invaded by protestors and been subjected to covert filming. We also know of anti-meat led groups who have made incursions onto farms, particularly in the pig and poultry sectors, in order to obtain film footage by which to damage the reputation of British Farming and to further promote their causes.

I have to say, I am impressed by Camor and believe that now, more then ever, we have to take food security and supply chain security seriously and this begins with farm security.
 

Wombat

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East yorks
Well, according to the Association of Insurance Surveyors and the Association of British Insurers your premiums would be reduced if your security was increased

We have just had a 4% council tax increase thats supposed to pay for a group of people called the "police", having not seen one of this group of people in many a year (apart from motoring offences on the TV) i am unsure what they are or what we are paying for?
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
We have just had a 4% council tax increase thats supposed to pay for a group of people called the "police", having not seen one of this group of people in many a year (apart from motoring offences on the TV) i am unsure what they are or what we are paying for?
An interesting observation. However, and whilst I am not here to sell their services, the police tend to be a reactive service and not a pro-active one. Take for example the 78 yr old pig farmer who went to his sheds one morning, opened the door went in turned on the lights and found 80 people dressed head to toe in black with full balaclavas standing stone still and in complete silence. I believe he had a heart attack and but for one of these people stepping in, could have died. Security is of course your choice as is the choice of the insurers to pay out should you suffer theft or damage. In the sector I work in we have recently seen factory incursions and attempts to put reputational damage onto businesses and the businesses they supply. We have all seen covert filming on farms and in abattoirs. Even if our post simply encourages you to self review / self audit your security measures it may have had a benefit for you.
 

wr.

Member
Location
Breconshire
"We have seen our members be firebombed, their sites invaded by protestors and been subjected to covert filming."

Crickey! If this is happening to your members, there's not much hope for the rest of us. :oops:
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
"We have seen our members be firebombed, their sites invaded by protestors and been subjected to covert filming."

Crickey! If this is happening to your members, there's not much hope for the rest of us. :oops:
Regrettably this is what is happening which is why our members are investing in site security. What is more, the British Retail Consortium Food Safety Standard Version 9 will be published later this year. This is the standard that supermarkets buy to. Basically, if their supplier doesn't have BRC to AA+, AA, A or B grade then they are unlikely to be able to supply. BRC V9 requires that a processing business has, in addition to HACCP, that they also have TACCP (Threat Awareness Critical Control Points) and VACCP (Vulnerability Assessment Critical Control Points). Both of these include within the standard, site security and actions to ensure site security. As farmers supplying the processors there may well be a time when you too are required to undertake similar TACCP and VACCP procedures on farm.
 

CAMOR

Member
Some interesting comments. Security is an investment, and something which in the current climate of increasing fuel costs etc is perhaps not seen as a priority. However, the food and agriculture sectors face evolving and emerging threats from a new generation of motivated protesters and other threat actors or groups, seeking to exploit vulnerabilities, and can have significant impact on not just individual sites, but the industry in general. The Food Sector is as critical a sector as the other transport and infrastructure sectors, and this has been recognised through the introduction of the new measures/standards that are planned to be published by the BRC.

Appropriate staff training provides a layer of risk management which can enhance capability and resilience, and suitably trained staff can potentially identify those who may have hostile intent to your site. In addition, staff will be more competent at responding correctly to any ongoing threat, with the early identification of suspicious behaviours having significant benefits to potentially prevent an attack on a site.

By creating a strong security culture within your site, you will reinforce the message that security is everyone’s responsibility, a message that we are constantly reminded of. Taking responsibility and being proactive in terms of preventative work is well recognised as having greater benefit and impact than waiting and being reactive, which often leads to significant disruption, damage to reputation, but most importantly may impact on the safety of your staff.

By "target hardening" your site, the objective is to discourage potential threats. Better to be ahead of the curve.
 
Location
southwest
Well, according to the Association of Insurance Surveyors and the Association of British Insurers your premiums would be reduced if your security was increased


So why don't the Insurance Companies hire the likes of you to "police" the premises they insure and reduce the number of claims made on their policies?

Fitting a burglar alarm doesn't reduce burglaries, it just makes the burglars try a bit harder.
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
So why don't the Insurance Companies hire the likes of you to "police" the premises they insure and reduce the number of claims made on their policies?

Fitting a burglar alarm doesn't reduce burglaries, it just makes the burglars try a bit harder.
With respect, they aren't going to employ the 'likes of' me as I work in the abattoir sector. A sector which faces significant 'interest' from 'terrorists', animal rights, etc.
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
Just to clarify my comment, the cost:benefit ratio doesn't justify hiring a security firm.

Banks, Securicor etc still get robbed.
They are not a security firm. They are a firm offering online security training for you and your staff in order that you may be more alert to the treat and have in place sufficient 'defenses' to encourage those who wish to breach your farms security to maybe try elsewhere.
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
They are not a security firm. They are a firm offering online security training for you and your staff in order that you may be more alert to the treat and have in place sufficient 'defenses' to encourage those who wish to breach your farms security to maybe try elsewhere.
Some interesting comments. Security is an investment, and something which in the current climate of increasing fuel costs etc. is perhaps not seen as a priority. However, the food and agriculture sectors face evolving and emerging threats from a new generation of motivated protesters and other threat actors or groups, seeking to exploit vulnerabilities, and can have significant impact on not just individual sites, but the industry in general. The Food Sector is as critical a sector as the other transport and infrastructure sectors, and this has been recognised through the introduction of the new measures/standards that are planned to be published by the BRC.

Appropriate staff training provides a layer of risk management which can enhance capability and resilience, and suitably trained staff can potentially identify those who may have hostile intent to your site. In addition, staff will be more competent at responding correctly to any ongoing threat, with the early identification of suspicious behaviours having significant benefits to potentially prevent an attack on a site.

By creating a strong security culture within your site, you will reinforce the message that security is everyone’s responsibility, a message that we are constantly reminded of. Taking responsibility and being proactive in terms of preventative work is well recognised as having greater benefit and impact than waiting and being reactive, which often leads to significant disruption, damage to reputation, but most importantly may impact on the safety of your staff.

By "target hardening" your site, the objective is to discourage potential threats. Better to be ahead of the curve.
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
They are not a security firm. They are a firm offering online security training for you and your staff in order that you may be more alert to the treat and have in place sufficient 'defenses' to encourage those who wish to breach your farms security to maybe try elsewhere.
One other thing and out of pure idle curiosity, given that you don't know the cost of training how can you work out a cost benefit ratio?
Obviously the benefit would be the value of what you may have taken, the value of your reputation should it get trashed, the loss of sales etc. all of which would amount to a fair bit.
 
Location
southwest
With respect, they aren't going to employ the 'likes of' me as I work in the abattoir sector. A sector which faces significant 'interest' from 'terrorists', animal rights, etc.

Whatever service you provide, the truth of the argument is still the same-paying you would cost more than the Insurance companies would save in reduced claims.

If a farmer spends £100 on pig feed he will see that more than returned in increased production. If he spends £100 on security advice or whatever it is you are selling, there is absolutely no guarantee that he will get any of that money back.

If people are determined to enter a property, it's virtually impossible to stop them-more so with so called eco-terrorists who actually want to be caught so that they can face a trial which gives more publicity to their cause.

The cheapest and most effective way to discourage intruders is a big noisy dog.

PS-I will not charge for that bit of security advice.
 
Location
southwest
One other thing and out of pure idle curiosity, given that you don't know the cost of training how can you work out a cost benefit ratio?
Obviously the benefit would be the value of what you may have taken, the value of your reputation should it get trashed, the loss of sales etc. all of which would amount to a fair bit.

Out of pure idle curiosity how can you put a value on what you may save a client?

I say "may" as, despite what scaremongers like yourself say, the chances of being a victim of the sort of crimes you refer to are incredibly small. So the chances of you saving anyone money are also incredibly small.

Like Insurance Companies, "Security" firms just play on people's fears, much as in the earlier post referring to an elderly farmer.
 

AIMS

Member
Trade
Location
UK
Some interesting comments. Security is an investment, and something which in the current climate of increasing fuel costs etc. is perhaps not seen as a priority. However, the food and agriculture sectors face evolving and emerging threats from a new generation of motivated protesters and other threat actors or groups, seeking to exploit vulnerabilities, and can have significant impact on not just individual sites, but the industry in general. The Food Sector is as critical a sector as the other transport and infrastructure sectors, and this has been recognised through the introduction of the new measures/standards that are planned to be published by the BRC.

Appropriate staff training provides a layer of risk management which can enhance capability and resilience, and suitably trained staff can potentially identify those who may have hostile intent to your site. In addition, staff will be more competent at responding correctly to any ongoing threat, with the early identification of suspicious behaviours having significant benefits to potentially prevent an attack on a site.

By creating a strong security culture within your site, you will reinforce the message that security is everyone’s responsibility, a message that we are constantly reminded of. Taking responsibility and being proactive in terms of preventative work is well recognised as having greater benefit and impact than waiting and being reactive, which often leads to significant disruption, damage to reputation, but most importantly may impact on the safety of your staff.

By "target hardening" your site, the objective is to discourage potential threats. Better to be ahead of the curve.
Whatever service you provide, the truth of the argument is still the same-paying you would cost more than the Insurance companies would save in reduced claims.

If a farmer spends £100 on pig feed he will see that more than returned in increased production. If he spends £100 on security advice or whatever it is you are selling, there is absolutely no guarantee that he will get any of that money back.

If people are determined to enter a property, it's virtually impossible to stop them-more so with so called eco-terrorists who actually want to be caught so that they can face a trial which gives more publicity to their cause.

The cheapest and most effective way to discourage intruders is a big noisy dog.

PS-I will not charge for that bit of security advice.
Good Morning

I draw your attention to this bit from your last post: "whatever it is you are selling"

I am not selling anything!

The Association of Independent Meat Suppliers (AIMS) is the UK's largest trade body for abattoirs and meat cutting plants.

Our original post was in relation to a business called Camor, who are selling security training!

Now, if I am to deduce from your post that you are a pig farmer, I am very well aware of the issues which you are facing. AIMS meets twice a week with Defra on their pig & poultry calls (the members of the group are AIMS, AHDB, NPA, BMPA and BPC) and it was this group who worked to get Private Storage Aid and the Slaughter Incentive Payment Scheme in place.

I have no issues with you replying to our post, but do please, try to reply on the basis of fact and not supposition
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
So what we are essentially admitting is that we no longer have sufficient back up from the police, judiciary and ultimately government to keep our businesses safe. In fact some of the “activists” we face are encouraged by the judiciary and government. So we are going down road of employing private militia.
The message to me is quite clear. “We as a government couldn’t give one about the security of farming businesses”. So actually I couldn’t give one about their food security and won’t be busting a gut over that.
Help me and I’ll help you. Show is disdain and we’ll show you disdain. Since having my sheds cleared of all useful tools on several occasions I no longer bother replacing them. The job doesn’t pay for that or the private security firms now supposedly needed. As a result my productive efficiency suffers but hey ho that’s modern couldn’t care less Britain. I’m getting used it. I’m alright Jack. I just invest my capital in countries that do take commercial busyness activity seriously.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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