Forage wagon road distance

Cowwilf

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cheshire
How far are people traveling with forage wagons?

Our job would average 3/4 miles field to clamp 2 / 3miles good main road, the remainder lanes and farm drives contactor recons it'd work out dearer than forager but obviously that depends on volume of crop.

Would be a contractor payed on the hour doing the job. buckrake would work out dearer as would be here longer unless several wagons could be put on.

My thinking is 1st cut forager, later cuts wagon

I know of people going further but with there own wagon so not as worried about time
 

jerseycowsman

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
cornwall
How far are people traveling with forage wagons?

Our job would average 3/4 miles field to clamp 2 / 3miles good main road, the remainder lanes and farm drives contactor recons it'd work out dearer than forager but obviously that depends on volume of crop.

Would be a contractor payed on the hour doing the job. buckrake would work out dearer as would be here longer unless several wagons could be put on.

My thinking is 1st cut forager, later cuts wagon

I know of people going further but with there own wagon so not as worried about time
I am wondering exactly the same thing.
at the moment we need a forager and 5 or 6 trailers to do off ground. Surely 3 or 4 forage wagons would be as fast and cost less?
 

sidjon

Member
Location
EXMOOR
We use 2 wagons to run 2/3 miles, to many trailers don't work for us as my farm track is mile long without any passing places. Still work's out cheaper as Don't have trailer traffic jam's.
 

pappuller

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
M6 Hard shoulder
We have 90 acres round the farm that 2 wagons will easily clear in a short day and 60 acres between 3 and 4 miles away, usually do a majority of the 60 acres separately as its much later ground. Too few wagons can be a slow job, too many and it makes the pit man earn his corn
 

jondear

Member
Location
Devon
@Devon James .He does it all close ,far .1or 2 could be 3 now!Seems to work for us .Done with high horsepower grass blowers and umpteen trailers running the roads .That's was before fuel got so expensive .Must be £50 hour now for 14 t tractor and trailer +man
 
How far are people traveling with forage wagons?

Our job would average 3/4 miles field to clamp 2 / 3miles good main road, the remainder lanes and farm drives contactor recons it'd work out dearer than forager but obviously that depends on volume of crop.

Would be a contractor payed on the hour doing the job. buckrake would work out dearer as would be here longer unless several wagons could be put on.

My thinking is 1st cut forager, later cuts wagon

I know of people going further but with there own wagon so not as worried about time

I help a friend of mine out with a 5 mile draw with my wagon. He has two wagons drawing too. He has ground around the yard too so when we come back from the long draw we bring in a load back from the near field and that keeps the loader man busy all day and not under pressure.

Its not heavy grass but its still taking the most of an hour to get a load on that draw. One wagon would be far too slow on that job.
 
We regularly do ground 3 miles away from the clamp - on multi-cut system 2 wagons cope fine - if it was heavier cuts I'd put another wagon on.

With regard to using forager gang for first cut and wagons for later cuts - what is it you are trying to achieve? If you are thinking you will have a bulkier first cut done with forage gang to justify the cost (assuming they are charging by the acre) you will compromise quality. If ever there was a year to make quality your priority, this is it. Perfect storm of diesel cost and high grain price will make every kg of cake saved by feeding higher quality forage more important. Overall production with 4 cuts will exceed 3 cuts and be higher quality. Cost per tonne with wagons will be way less with fuel use of around 200+ litres per day/wagon compared to a fleet of trailers.
 

Martyn

Member
Location
South west
Has anyone any recommendations for a silage additive applicator, have been priced £3k for adding 1 to a wagon,looking at pumps last night they arnt that dear, and just for ourselves I'm sure a homemade job can be done.
 

puppet

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
sw scotland
How heavy are those wagons when they're full of grass?
They have a weigh cell, our contractor has it set to 10 tons so 17 tons gross. A lot more grass than your average 12 ton trailer.
On a longer haul you would need 2 wagons so they will seem to be wasting time carting rather than cutting but alternative is 6 trailers which cost a lot in hire and fuel too and have idle time between loading following the forager round the field.
150 litres per trailer and forager at 300l gives 1200l per day.
2 wagons maybe 500l to do a similar area. £700 saving.
 

vantage

Member
Location
Pembs
its just that as fuel prices increase the relative costs become even more obvious and more people start to appreciate the size of the gap?
Absolutely. Unfortunately round here not many wagons, my former silage contractor with wagons gave up, current contractor runs two SPFHs. Don’t have a tractor here to pull a wagon if I bought one, or the labour force for the rest of the operation, cannot see the contractor wanting to pull it and do the rest of the job.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
need to be more specific - vast range of sizes - ours are mid-range (?) - holding 12-14t of grass at 30%DM depending on how you drive. Well wlited, sugary grass gets a hell of a load on as it compresses into 'briquettes' as it goes through the knives
Just wondering how many stay under 18 ton gross? The big ones look very heavy. I suppose its no different to the chopper boys with their tri axle trailers though.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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