Front end loader query

Highashgrange

Member
Arable Farmer
We need another loader mainly for bale carting but instead of a telescopic I’m wondering about a front end loader to go onto a large frame case Puma 220hp. All it’ll do is move 1200t of straw from fields to the yard. Any pointers please as I’ve never even used one before.
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
Stoll currently supply the CNH branded loaders. They should therefore be simplest to retrofit to your tractor.

HOWEVER, I had a stoll, tried an MX, and now bought my second quicke. Stoll have a long reach compared to others, they are certainly now stronger built than the model that I owned (which the boom pulled apart from the mounting bearing boxes). MX offers arguably the best forward vision, and easier removal for an "amateur" operator. Quicke lift and tear out forces are best, and has greater carriage articulation than the others.

For just shifting straw, either quicke or MX make a loader that is suitable for the puma. The most important bit it's how it's plumbed in to the hydraulics, and the joystick position.

Ideally you'd connect to midmount valves and use the tractor armrest electric joystick. If there aren't midmounts (and it's not likely there will be on something the size of the puma), then plumb it into the rear end spools, and use quarter turn shut-off valves to direct the flow. This way you'll get the benefit of the armrest joystick.

Under no circumstances whatsoever should you add a propriety joystick working cables. They were a revelation for front end loader control 45 years ago, but so were cabs on tractors then!

Near every brand of tractor loader will come with a "Euro 8" carriage hitch as standard. You'll either need to modify the bale handler attachment, or get an adaptor plate from somebody like Taylor attachments to allow connection of the tractor loader to whatever forklift headstock that you use.

20210829_135256.jpg


This is how straw is shifted by us cowboy peasants rearing livestock in the hills
 

IOW91

Member
Livestock Farmer
I've always had quicke loaders, well built and good to get on with. I've never herd anything bad said about mx either in fairness.

If you have arm rest joy stick definitely make the most of that.

A long wheel base puma with a loader will be great in the field for loading. (I personally like telehandlers for almost all loader stuff. But for field loading a big loader tractor is the better option)
 

BuskhillFarm

Member
Arable Farmer
Have a quicke 66 on a jd 6140r was on a t6080 before. It’s the first combo that makes me think a tractor and loader is actually better than a load all for that type of job. If possible get it on tractor joystick/mid mounts like I had on nh t6080. I went for the quicke lever when on the jd, and wish I spent on either mid mount or even quicker electro joystick as it’s much nicer, although the lever is Uber reliable
 

Davy

Member
Location
North NI
Stoll currently supply the CNH branded loaders. They should therefore be simplest to retrofit to your tractor.

HOWEVER, I had a stoll, tried an MX, and now bought my second quicke. Stoll have a long reach compared to others, they are certainly now stronger built than the model that I owned (which the boom pulled apart from the mounting bearing boxes). MX offers arguably the best forward vision, and easier removal for an "amateur" operator. Quicke lift and tear out forces are best, and has greater carriage articulation than the others.

For just shifting straw, either quicke or MX make a loader that is suitable for the puma. The most important bit it's how it's plumbed in to the hydraulics, and the joystick position.

Ideally you'd connect to midmount valves and use the tractor armrest electric joystick. If there aren't midmounts (and it's not likely there will be on something the size of the puma), then plumb it into the rear end spools, and use quarter turn shut-off valves to direct the flow. This way you'll get the benefit of the armrest joystick.

Under no circumstances whatsoever should you add a propriety joystick working cables. They were a revelation for front end loader control 45 years ago, but so were cabs on tractors then!

Near every brand of tractor loader will come with a "Euro 8" carriage hitch as standard. You'll either need to modify the bale handler attachment, or get an adaptor plate from somebody like Taylor attachments to allow connection of the tractor loader to whatever forklift headstock that you use.

View attachment 983714

This is how straw is shifted by us cowboy peasants rearing livestock in the hills
When you say to plumb them into the rear spools, do you mean to take a tee off at the slice? Is there any restriction in flow doing this?
 
Have a quicke 66 on a jd 6140r was on a t6080 before. It’s the first combo that makes me think a tractor and loader is actually better than a load all for that type of job. If possible get it on tractor joystick/mid mounts like I had on nh t6080. I went for the quicke lever when on the jd, and wish I spent on either mid mount or even quicker electro joystick as it’s much nicer, although the lever is Uber reliable
For actually picking stuff up and moving it around a loadall is far superior (its what they are designed to do) but they are much heavier on the ground. For in field work a tractor is so much kinder on the soil it more than makes up for any shortcomings there may be.
 
Stoll currently supply the CNH branded loaders. They should therefore be simplest to retrofit to your tractor.

HOWEVER, I had a stoll, tried an MX, and now bought my second quicke. Stoll have a long reach compared to others, they are certainly now stronger built than the model that I owned (which the boom pulled apart from the mounting bearing boxes). MX offers arguably the best forward vision, and easier removal for an "amateur" operator. Quicke lift and tear out forces are best, and has greater carriage articulation than the others.

For just shifting straw, either quicke or MX make a loader that is suitable for the puma. The most important bit it's how it's plumbed in to the hydraulics, and the joystick position.

Ideally you'd connect to midmount valves and use the tractor armrest electric joystick. If there aren't midmounts (and it's not likely there will be on something the size of the puma), then plumb it into the rear end spools, and use quarter turn shut-off valves to direct the flow. This way you'll get the benefit of the armrest joystick.

Under no circumstances whatsoever should you add a propriety joystick working cables. They were a revelation for front end loader control 45 years ago, but so were cabs on tractors then!

Near every brand of tractor loader will come with a "Euro 8" carriage hitch as standard. You'll either need to modify the bale handler attachment, or get an adaptor plate from somebody like Taylor attachments to allow connection of the tractor loader to whatever forklift headstock that you use.

View attachment 983714

This is how straw is shifted by us cowboy peasants rearing livestock in the hills
Cabed tractors, ffs what the hell are you talking about???!!!😆😆😆
20191231_145837.jpg

Laugh all ye like at the load, you haven't seen the hills where it's taken to get it out of the paddock!!!😆😆😆
 

Mark C

Member
Location
Bedfordshire
Looked ar Quicke and MX earlier this year as wanted and extra loader to take peak pressure off the telehandlers. Chose MX 412+ with Jcb headstock from Taylor Attachments not regretted it. Great loader , joystick is a joy to use abd can be used with a front linkage if I fitted one. Backup and service from MX has been superb. Steve Davis from MX came out a month after we’d been using it to check we were happy. He recalibrated the joystick as it was a bit too sensitive. Nothing too much trouble.
 

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Chieftain

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Nottinghamshire
Cant beat a tractor loader in the field, you'll be grateful for the better comfort and higher seating position. Not to mention the CVX transmission will be ideal for inching and accuracy when loading. Also handy having something designed to pull the trailer you're loading too, makes it a one man job if you want it to be. Mostly used JD loaders on JD tractors and not had a problem with them but also had a Quicke loader that was decent too. Only thing I noticed with it is that the locking pins seemed a bit flimsy but they may have changed from the over-centre lever system now. Electro joystick would be a bonus if it's possible but the hydraulic flow on a 220hp tractor should more than make up for the awkwardness of a cable joystick if that's the only option.
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
When you say to plumb them into the rear spools, do you mean to take a tee off at the slice? Is there any restriction in flow doing this?
No more restriction than putting the oil through a half inch coupling probe, so more than adequate for a front loader. Quicke for example recommend a maximum of 100l/min, which means you should be turning down the flow on most modern tractors anyway.
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
We need another loader mainly for bale carting but instead of a telescopic I’m wondering about a front end loader to go onto a large frame case Puma 220hp. All it’ll do is move 1200t of straw from fields to the yard. Any pointers please as I’ve never even used one before.
What’s the shuttle like on a puma
And are you pulling off chaser stacks or loose in field
You want shuttle like old Massey power control so it’s quick and smooth to change not like jerky switch on a jd or similar and power shift wired into joystick so you can change gears
 
Stoll currently supply the CNH branded loaders. They should therefore be simplest to retrofit to your tractor.

HOWEVER, I had a stoll, tried an MX, and now bought my second quicke. Stoll have a long reach compared to others, they are certainly now stronger built than the model that I owned (which the boom pulled apart from the mounting bearing boxes). MX offers arguably the best forward vision, and easier removal for an "amateur" operator. Quicke lift and tear out forces are best, and has greater carriage articulation than the others.

For just shifting straw, either quicke or MX make a loader that is suitable for the puma. The most important bit it's how it's plumbed in to the hydraulics, and the joystick position.

Ideally you'd connect to midmount valves and use the tractor armrest electric joystick. If there aren't midmounts (and it's not likely there will be on something the size of the puma), then plumb it into the rear end spools, and use quarter turn shut-off valves to direct the flow. This way you'll get the benefit of the armrest joystick.

Under no circumstances whatsoever should you add a propriety joystick working cables. They were a revelation for front end loader control 45 years ago, but so were cabs on tractors then!

Near every brand of tractor loader will come with a "Euro 8" carriage hitch as standard. You'll either need to modify the bale handler attachment, or get an adaptor plate from somebody like Taylor attachments to allow connection of the tractor loader to whatever forklift headstock that you use.

View attachment 983714

This is how straw is shifted by us cowboy peasants rearing livestock in the hills
No the real cowboy peasants only use 90hp and no straps
 

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dave mountain

Member
Livestock Farmer
Choosing the right sized loader for the tractor and it's work is much more important than the loader brand, all the brands are good nowadays. I like the sigma4 loaders, that's what will likely replace my quicke eventually. When people moan about a loader, it's usually because it's incorrectly sized or specced for the job or the tractor, rather than a fault with the loader itself.
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
Choosing the right sized loader for the tractor and it's work is much more important than the loader brand, all the brands are good nowadays. I like the sigma4 loaders, that's what will likely replace my quicke eventually. When people moan about a loader, it's usually because it's incorrectly sized or specced for the job or the tractor, rather than a fault with the loader itself.
Aye very true, the only thing worse than a loader that isn't big enough, is one that's too big for the tractor. Too big for the tractor isn't something that the OP will really need to worry about though!

The sigma 4 loaders are fine for light work, but neither the brackets nor the boom are anywhere near as well engineered in comparison to the current models from quicke, Stoll or MX. The difference in strength is most obvious when comparing headstocks, but it's the same for knee plate joints, pin pivots, boom arms, subframe brackets, etc etc etc. Sigma 4 cost less, but it's for a reason.
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
No the real cowboy peasants only use 90hp and no straps
Aye that's fine for a few local miles down the road, you don't even need trailer lights for that 😜 (though I did have a few more ponies than 90)

DSC_0419.JPG


I've not had the courage to employ the "normal" peasant farmer straw carting procedure when each journey involves a trip around the Edinburgh city bypass 😱
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
Aye very true, the only thing worse than a loader that isn't big enough, is one that's too big for the tractor. Too big for the tractor isn't something that the OP will really need to worry about though!

The sigma 4 loaders are fine for light work, but neither the brackets nor the boom are anywhere near as well engineered in comparison to the current models from quicke, Stoll or MX. The difference in strength is most obvious when comparing headstocks, but it's the same for knee plate joints, pin pivots, boom arms, subframe brackets, etc etc etc. Sigma 4 cost less, but it's for a reason.
Only one losder to consider. Quickie 980 or new model
 

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