front mowers? what's good bad and down right useless !!!!

danpwll

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
flintshire
looking to upgrade the old claas front mower, what do you run and whats a good front?? got a kuhn rear 2003 and she 's been a good reliable bus, got fendt driving them, anybody had a fendt mower ? or are they just a fella in disguise ?
 

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
If you are going for a moco, I’d strongly advise a “pull type” hitch system. They are far better at riding the ground with the extra weight of the conditioner. Plain disc front mowers is a little different. Push type headstocks can be used safely as you are suspending less weight. EDIT. I assumed your comment “old Claas mower” means it’s likely to be a “push type” hitch
 

Andrew

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Huntingdon, UK
I'd agree with that, pull type ones are better. I have a Pottinger and it runs a treat, I'm on my second (First one is years old and still going strong with it's new owner). The McHale one, and the SIP ones also look good.

Personally I'd avoid anything with plastic conditioner tines.

Look for one that won't spit the bed out if you hit something as well. Krone have the safecut roll pin thing. Pottinger the skid plate extends forward of the disc, only the blades stick out forwards, so if you hit something no damage is done.

The Fendt mower is Fella I believe, I wouldn't be that keen to have one.
 

Barleycorn

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Hampshire
If you are going for a moco, I’d strongly advise a “pull type” hitch system. They are far better at riding the ground with the extra weight of the conditioner. Plain disc front mowers is a little different. Push type headstocks can be used safely as you are suspending less weight. EDIT. I assumed your comment “old Claas mower” means it’s likely to be a “push type” hitch
Don't suppose you could recommend one Martin?!!
 

Barleycorn

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Hampshire
Actually no! While I don’t hide who I am I won’t use these posts to advertise. We do banner ads in this platform and I will answer questions but I have decided not to advertise as that’s not what this forum and its subjects are really about IMHO.
Very noble, but I was discussing mowers with a mutual friend.
 

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
Very noble, but I was discussing mowers with a mutual friend.
Just the way I see it. If I reacted to every mention of a competitive brand I’d go mad, so best to read and move on. I’ve had a lifetime of working with lesser respected (if that’s a fair way to say it) brands so had to fight for every sale and progress. Funny that what was the JF brand now under a different colour and name appears to be better accepted! Yes, think I know who you’ve been chatting to. My view is a bit like not selling machines to good friends. I’ve had a number of ex college friends that I’ve happily seen not run products that I was selling. They were/are my friends so don’t mix business with pleasure. Best advice I was given when I started out. That said, I know loads of farmers and contractors who run brands I have and do sell, but they are business friends so to speak - very different.
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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