Future trends

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Once more I feel I should point out future medium term trends and prospects. This time the warning does not come from marketing consultants or prospective manufacturer's publicity material. It comes from Tesco who aim to actively promote alternatives to food produced from animals.

From the web site...
It will aim to sell more plant-based sausages and burgers, as well as products designed to emulate meat.

The UK market for meat alternatives could be worth more than £1.1bn by 2024, according to analyst firm Mintel.

Tesco said meat and dairy production had a "significant impact" on environments such as the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil, and "is acknowledged as a major contributor to climate change".

The UK's largest retailer aims to introduce more plant-based product lines, as well as selling more of the lines it already stocks, a spokesman said.

These include "ready meals, breaded-meat alternatives, plant-based sausages, burgers, quiches, pies, [and] party food".

Tesco said it wanted to focus on making the products affordable and innovative. It will also stock meat alternatives alongside meat - "for example Richmond sausages and Richmond plant-based sausages to feature together," it said.

It will also start to publish sales of plant-based proteins as a percentage of overall protein sales every year.

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis said: "Our transparency on protein sales and our new sales target for meat alternatives gives us the platform to becoming more sustainable and will provide customers with even more choice."


So be of no doubt, Tesco is under the impression that intensive vegetable production is more 'sustainable' than animal production and they will apparently be actively marketing alternatives as such across a wide variety of products, yet still pushing the pretence of it being meat, by marketing it alongside the real thing in my view.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders

topground

Member
Location
North Somerset.
Lidl, who are currently giving Tesco the run around, have had vegan mince and burgers in their meat display but on my weekly visits those products have always been marked down by 30% and now those products have disappeared altogether.
Tesco marketing gurus might wish to see an increase in the sale of this kind of chemical mush because of the perceived increased profitability but it won’t last long on the shelves if they have to throw it away.
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Once more I feel I should point out future medium term trends and prospects. This time the warning does not come from marketing consultants or prospective manufacturer's publicity material. It comes from Tesco who aim to actively promote alternatives to food produced from animals.

From the web site...
It will aim to sell more plant-based sausages and burgers, as well as products designed to emulate meat.

The UK market for meat alternatives could be worth more than £1.1bn by 2024, according to analyst firm Mintel.

Tesco said meat and dairy production had a "significant impact" on environments such as the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil, and "is acknowledged as a major contributor to climate change".

The UK's largest retailer aims to introduce more plant-based product lines, as well as selling more of the lines it already stocks, a spokesman said.

These include "ready meals, breaded-meat alternatives, plant-based sausages, burgers, quiches, pies, [and] party food".

Tesco said it wanted to focus on making the products affordable and innovative. It will also stock meat alternatives alongside meat - "for example Richmond sausages and Richmond plant-based sausages to feature together," it said.

It will also start to publish sales of plant-based proteins as a percentage of overall protein sales every year.

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis said: "Our transparency on protein sales and our new sales target for meat alternatives gives us the platform to becoming more sustainable and will provide customers with even more choice."


So be of no doubt, Tesco is under the impression that intensive vegetable production is more 'sustainable' than animal production and they will apparently be actively marketing alternatives as such across a wide variety of products, yet still pushing the pretence of it being meat, by marketing it alongside the real thing in my view.
No such thing as vegan meat, unless you are going to eat the vegans in which case rather you than me
 

Hilly

Member
Once more I feel I should point out future medium term trends and prospects. This time the warning does not come from marketing consultants or prospective manufacturer's publicity material. It comes from Tesco who aim to actively promote alternatives to food produced from animals.

From the web site...
It will aim to sell more plant-based sausages and burgers, as well as products designed to emulate meat.

The UK market for meat alternatives could be worth more than £1.1bn by 2024, according to analyst firm Mintel.

Tesco said meat and dairy production had a "significant impact" on environments such as the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil, and "is acknowledged as a major contributor to climate change".

The UK's largest retailer aims to introduce more plant-based product lines, as well as selling more of the lines it already stocks, a spokesman said.

These include "ready meals, breaded-meat alternatives, plant-based sausages, burgers, quiches, pies, [and] party food".

Tesco said it wanted to focus on making the products affordable and innovative. It will also stock meat alternatives alongside meat - "for example Richmond sausages and Richmond plant-based sausages to feature together," it said.

It will also start to publish sales of plant-based proteins as a percentage of overall protein sales every year.

Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis said: "Our transparency on protein sales and our new sales target for meat alternatives gives us the platform to becoming more sustainable and will provide customers with even more choice."


So be of no doubt, Tesco is under the impression that intensive vegetable production is more 'sustainable' than animal production and they will apparently be actively marketing alternatives as such across a wide variety of products, yet still pushing the pretence of it being meat, by marketing it alongside the real thing in my view.

when you selling your cows and buying cabbage seed then ?
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Tesco's just trying to survive, they're hoping what they see as a 'green' policy will get shoppers through the door, it's all they care about.
Only time will tell if it works, seems to me like they're in trouble and getting desperate but maybe they'll turn around.
Tesco are in no kind of trouble, but you are correct about them wanting to catch the shopping trends and sell more and gain market share. Which they state that they will be doing by actively promoting alternatives alongside real meat and dairy products, which will obviously eat into the volume and push the price of real meat downwards.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
when you selling your cows and buying cabbage seed then ?

For the industry it is going to be death by a thousand cuts I'm afraid. Give it ten years and probably most animal production will be commercially unviable given that forecast future trends become only half fulfilled. It only takes a small decrease in underlying demand to make a big difference to commodity prices and profits are only marginal on most farms today.
Yes, the better land may well be converted to arable, but much of the new alternative products are likely to contain very little farm crop. Environmental schemes are likely to be significant income generators for more part time farmers in future.
 
Veganism can't happen without a huge drop in world population, if it is to happen who is volunteering for the mass cull in the human population that can be fed from the areas of the world that can produce plants that humans can live on.

Being vegan is mostly an option for wealthy westerners so I wouldn't give it too much attention as most of the rest of the world don't have such choices.
 
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Lemken moves into slurry incorporation market

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Written by Justin Roberts from Agriland

Slurry application has moved forward tremendously over the past few years with the emphasis very much switching to using it as a resource rather than disposing of it as a waste product.

Even dyed in wool, tillage specialists such as Lemken are joining the movement with the company now offering what amounts to a conversion of their compact disc units to a slurry incorporation tool.

Lemken opt for Vogelsang heads​


This new product comprises a VogelSang slurry distribution head mounted on the frame of a set of Heliodor compact disc harrows.

Lemken claims that the Heliodor offers a sound basis for this type of application due to its...
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