Get ready to defend yourself

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
So the circus moves to Glasgow (by burning God knows how much fossil fuel).

The 'great and the good' from all corners of the planet from Carrie's puppet to Greta Whatserface are all going to be telling us the planet is fecked and it's all our fault.

Instead of defending ourselves, we should be going on the offensive. It's time to start shouting from the rooftops of Facebook and Twitter or anything else there is out there.

I'm sure the more switched on folk on here have better material, but here's a couple to get started with.....

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carbon.jpg

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kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
I'd agree but most UK Beef is finished indoors, with lots of concrete and diesel burnt and the climate means even animals that graze need to be housed in winter. There's also lots of other crops and inputs needed to produce that Beef. Now lots of these greenies won't realise that but there are enough clever ones out there to show the full picture.
One of the pictures in the first post shows 70% of the cows diet is grass, really?
I don't know what the answer is, I'm starting to think that people will only fully understand the importance of agriculture and food production, when there isn't enough food to go around.
 

Wooly

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Romney Marsh
About time someone stood up for us livestock farmers with some truer figures.

I'm fed up with alll the complete rubbish of information peddled by the plant based loving BBC and the holier than holy vegan brain washed morons.

I do wonder if the fossil fuel industries are also peddling the miss-information about meat eating, just to take the attention away from them.
 
I'd agree but most UK Beef is finished indoors, with lots of concrete and diesel burnt and the climate means even animals that graze need to be housed in winter.


So cows need a structure which may or may not include concrete.

Compare and contrast with any modern city. Take a good look at the Concrete, Steel and Fuel used in their great big hypocrasy venue.

How much CO2 does COP26 or Glasgow take away ?
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
So cows need a structure which may or may not include concrete.

Compare and contrast with any modern city. Take a good look at the Concrete, Steel and Fuel used in their great big hypocrasy venue.

How much CO2 does COP26 or Glasgow take away ?
In some countries they do yes. I'm not saying its wrong to house cattle, I'm saying if you only put half the story out there it will get picked apart and debunked at which point people will just think farmers lie all the time.
Promoting grass fed beef damages the reputation of other methods.
Do we really want farmers competing against each other trying to prove who has the greenest system?
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
I'd agree but most UK Beef is finished indoors, with lots of concrete and diesel burnt and the climate means even animals that graze need to be housed in winter. There's also lots of other crops and inputs needed to produce that Beef. Now lots of these greenies won't realise that but there are enough clever ones out there to show the full picture.
One of the pictures in the first post shows 70% of the cows diet is grass, really?
I don't know what the answer is, I'm starting to think that people will only fully understand the importance of agriculture and food production, when there isn't enough food to go around.
My cattle are grass fed, start to finish. Either fresh grass in the summer or silage in the winter. Yes, there is steel and concrete in the sheds, but they will last for years.
In addition, from the moment my cattle start coming in next week they will be producing dung which will add carbon to my soil in a year or 2’s time. This will help water retention and feed the soil biology as well as adding fertility instead of using artificial fertiliser. Rather than using straw the bedding will be from dried rushes which would otherwise be wasted.
 

mar

Member
@yellowbelly I completely agree with you that we need to do something but you need to hit the public with a photo and a short caption that grabs their attention and tugs at their heart strings.
That's how the vegans do it, they put up a photo of a cute calf and a one liner and it sticks in the readers mind. Their is to much detail in them photos above and the reader quickly looses interest.

What's needed is a photo with a caption on it that draws attention away from agriculture and on to something like air travel, space travel, second holiday homes, etc.
If we could come up with one or two ideas, there are a lot of members on here and some probably have good contacts and keep spreading it over and over on facebook and twitter
 
In some countries they do yes. I'm not saying its wrong to house cattle, I'm saying if you only put half the story out there it will get picked apart and debunked at which point people will just think farmers lie all the time.
Promoting grass fed beef damages the reputation of other methods.
Do we really want farmers competing against each other trying to prove who has the greenest system?


I agree that some people have an agenda and are only too willing to throw others under a bus - usually to make money.

There are lots of angles here all worth following.

Nobody has to blame someone else.

But unfortunately I don't see enough scepticism. I keep saying the figures just don't add up. It's time people attempted to think of ways of proving what they say - and pointing out where it fails flat on it's face.

But unfortunately I think a lot of people want some or a lot of what the lunatics are asking for.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
My cattle are grass fed, start to finish. Either fresh grass in the summer or silage in the winter. Yes, there is steel and concrete in the sheds, but they will last for years.
In addition, from the moment my cattle start coming in next week they will be producing dung which will add carbon to my soil in a year or 2’s time. This will help water retention and feed the soil biology as well as adding fertility instead of using artificial fertiliser. Rather than using straw the bedding will be from dried rushes which would otherwise be wasted.
I see nothing wrong with your system, I see nothing wrong with a permanently housed bull beef system either. Both systems do a fantastic job of producing quality food. The problem I see, is this green, environmental, save the planet agenda currently being pushed by so many people is creating a whole new industry where businesses compete to see how green, sustainable and regenerative they can be whilst not really changing anything. Its all about who can make more money and look good.
Supermarkets, food processors and individual farmers are jumping on the band wagon too, trying to gain market share.
I think global food production is too important for that and food producers should be standing together instead of competing against each other, before governments bugger it up completely and we have food shortages.
I just don't know how you do it?
 

roscoe erf

Member
Livestock Farmer
@yellowbelly I completely agree with you that we need to do something but you need to hit the public with a photo and a short caption that grabs their attention and tugs at their heart strings.
That's how the vegans do it, they put up a photo of a cute calf and a one liner and it sticks in the readers mind. Their is to much detail in them photos above and the reader quickly looses interest.

What's needed is a photo with a caption on it that draws attention away from agriculture and on to something like air travel, space travel, second holiday homes, etc.
If we could come up with one or two ideas, there are a lot of members on here and some probably have good contacts and keep spreading it over and over on facebook and twitter
EDA32A59-E8A5-4509-8A91-D636A25C90F4.jpeg
 
I'd agree but most UK Beef is finished indoors, with lots of concrete and diesel burnt and the climate means even animals that graze need to be housed in winter. There's also lots of other crops and inputs needed to produce that Beef. Now lots of these greenies won't realise that but there are enough clever ones out there to show the full picture.
One of the pictures in the first post shows 70% of the cows diet is grass, really?
I don't know what the answer is, I'm starting to think that people will only fully understand the importance of agriculture and food production, when there isn't enough food to go around.

can only speak for my beef production, but my cattle only graze on land not suitable for cultivation, with no fertiliser, come in at Winter time and are fattened on by products from the food industry. Straw for feed and bedding is baled and goes back to the land as fertiliser. Some of the buildings are made from reclaimed building material, with locally sourced chalk on the floors.
 

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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