H & s check before feed delivery

Yes I would expect the driver to assist unloading and if he refused I would tell
him to leave .. there is local feed supplier also one of the biggest coal
Suppliers in the country and I know the drivers have to assist unloading or
Loose their job
Think I know who you mean, have delivered a pallet of bags here a couple of times. If it’s who I think it is the drivers will do well to work as hard as the bosses.
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
I agree but the poster I replied to is a stickler for doing things right. Grinding the pallet forks is a bit like tying yourself off to the telehandler bucket when cleaning gutters. Sensible but not right.
we slip 2 bits of big pipe over the pallet forks
 

Optimus

Member
You were lucky not to have them just leave - I would have, or tipped on the ground and left you to it. Storing small bags of feed in a loft is from the 1960s, not modern farming. Too many old guys with damaged joints and yet some still don't learn.
My mate delivers tatties to chip shops.he regularly has to carry a ton of bags up 2 flights of steps on his own.then they kick up fuss cos they don't fry well so has to go back an swap them.
 
Think if I was the driver I’d either jump in the truck and put a break on and go too sleep or unstrap and reverse back and slam the breaks on until all the bags were off the wagon
if I owned the truck I think I’d be charging demurrage by the hour for any delays unloading. And I wouldn’t expect my driver to be unloading by hand, unless it was included in the freight price to the customer, at a substantial cost
 

JSmith

Member
Livestock Farmer
My mate delivers tatties to chip shops.he regularly has to carry a ton of bags up 2 flights of steps on his own.then they kick up fuss cos they don't fry well so has to go back an swap them.
I did that when I left school for a bit just to get off farm at the time, we’d do six to eight ton hand drops, used to pee me off when the gaffa would jump off the lorry an say “ I’ve just got to have a word with the owner” an then come back as you’d just done the last trolley full
 

caveman

Member
Location
East Sussex.
All went fine i was just a bit concerned as never been asked before. Just wanted to check for overhead wires, it's being tipped on grain store floor so no lifting, unloading or bins involved.
Had the same checks a few years ago, not long after a driver had touched a wire when tipping while blowing somewhere and perished.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Pretty much every transport company I’ve worked for which has regular deliveries to the same point will have some system of H&S checking the delivery points.
If you're a dairy farmer and want to supply Fonterra a man comes out with a big book of rules and a tape measure. Everything from the width of the road entrance (no gates allowed) to the size of the turnaround and height of the Vat stand. No tick, no pick up.
 

Whitepeak

Member
Livestock Farmer
When I worked as a feed rep 5+yrs ago, the company introduced a H&S check list that I had to fill in for every new customer. I didn't have to do one for existing customers, so whether the drivers did them. It detailed where feed was stored, access off the road, what size wagon could get in, what times they could deliver and mainly what hazards eg over head cables, livestock, dogs, children, uneven floor, shed height for tipped loads etc.
The company were getting to the stage where drivers were banned from going on lofts, blowing into trailers etc without a fixed point to attach the pipe. I think around the time a driver for another firm was killed blowing feed into a home modified shipping container that exploded!
 
Anyone remember unloading sugar beet pulp in cwt bags? They were stacked on end on an artic trailer, the driver would wheel them to the side, and you'd carry on your shoulder. If you were lucky the bags were still a bit squishy, but if they'd been loaded a day or two before it was like concrete.
Unloaded a few train carriages you had a time limit to load run back to farm unload those cwt bags gone hard we’re not nice twenty four ton I think in a carriage
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
My mate delivers tatties to chip shops.he regularly has to carry a ton of bags up 2 flights of steps on his own.then they kick up fuss cos they don't fry well so has to go back an swap them.
I’m guessing he’s a business owner and not a driver, and that the job is priced to include man handling.
 

Y Fan Wen

Member
Location
N W Snowdonia
But to expect the delivery driver to carry them ?
I called in a neighbouring farm once to find my local feed merchant (a 1 man business) just positioning his lorry for unloading. Assuming the farmer would appear any moment I stopped to chat with him while we waited. A few minutes later the farmer and his 2 burly sons came out of the house, waved, and went off in the pickup. I spent the next hour moving bags to the side of the bed for him to carry on his back into the shed. I made some comment on the lack of help, 'Didn't expect anything else', was his reply.
 
I called in a neighbouring farm once to find my local feed merchant (a 1 man business) just positioning his lorry for unloading. Assuming the farmer would appear any moment I stopped to chat with him while we waited. A few minutes later the farmer and his 2 burly sons came out of the house, waved, and went off in the pickup. I spent the next hour moving bags to the side of the bed for him to carry on his back into the shed. I made some comment on the lack of help, 'Didn't expect anything else', was his reply.
That’s just taking the p!ss, don’t know how old dad was but two burly sons could certainly have got stuck into shifting the bags.
I allways try to do as much as possible to assist any lorry driver regardless of type of load but I do expect them to meet me half way, so, for example, if they need me to unload them I expect to get plenty of advance notice of when they are coming so that I can make sure I’m ready.
The vast majority of drivers are very good with a few exceptions, there is one firm I will no longer let deliver fert and another I won’t buy feed off, life’s too short to deal with drivers who are a PITA
As they say, any firm is only as good as the people they employ,
 

The new Sustainable Farming Incentive

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The new Sustainable Farming Incentive

Written by Tom Lewis


Source: Natural England

At NFU21, The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs...
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