Harvest 2019

bankrupt

Member
Location
EX17/20
adding up the cost of remedial cultivations to repair the damage by the straw crews and the loss of OM and K and straw needs to be a good price.
Being 80 miles or so West of you, Brisel, the numbers here usually stack up.

The most difficult thing always to remember here is to re-invest that portion of one's straw income necessary to replace the nutrients lost, rectify the damage, etc, etc (typically 50-60% here) and not to allow one's accountant to divert it all towards a new combine.

:D:D
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
Wish we'd sold all the straw standing, this year.

Selling by the bale, or by the ton baled, with us still responsible for all the baling, has made this weather into a triple whammy instead of just the inevitable double (the combines and driers).
Well said! It's nice having sold standing straw to just be able to concentrate on the weather for getting the grain in. If it's due to rain that evening, or the next day the customer can clear it 10x quicker than I ever could.
 

Two Tone

Member
Mixed Farmer
Being 80 miles or so West of you, Brisel, the numbers here usually stack up.

The most difficult thing always to remember here is to re-invest that portion of one's straw income necessary to replace the nutrients lost, rectify the damage, etc, etc (typically 50-60% here) and not to allow one's accountant to divert it all towards a new combine.

:D:D
Blimey!
Who’s your accountant?

I’d like one like that.
Mine keeps telling me that doing things like using straw income to justify new equipment is “back of fag packet” accountancy!
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
Being 80 miles or so West of you, Brisel, the numbers here usually stack up.

The most difficult thing always to remember here is to re-invest that portion of one's straw income necessary to replace the nutrients lost, rectify the damage, etc, etc (typically 50-60% here) and not to allow one's accountant to divert it all towards a new combine.

:D:D
Blame the accountant...!
 

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How to mitigate heat stress in cattle

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Written by John Swire

With temperatures forecast to rise above 25°C, cattle producers should be prepared to mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on their beef and dairy animals.

“Cattle are fairly comfortable when the ambient temperature is between 15°C and 25°C over the summer months but if the thermometer rises significantly, production performance will start to suffer,” warns Jacob Lakin from Azelis Animal Nutrition.

“This is because both a milk production and growing beef animal will start to divert energy away from production performance towards keeping cool. You’ll notice if a cow is struggling during a summer heatwave because she will start to salivate heavily and pant...
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