Harvest worries

I always enjoyed harvest as an employee operating somebody else’s combine. Then you only had to concentrate on getting the best from the machine.
One was not concerned with making the repayments, how much fuel is it using, where is the next empty trailer, will that belt hold out, have I enough spares, is there some issue at the drier, which field will be fit next, who is that standing by the gateway etc etc.

I found it a completely different experience from owning and running the combine .
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
We live in a country where, even if it all goes to crap, the state will house you; supply money for basic needs; educate your children; care for you in old age; and fix you if you break. I think a lot, including me, forget that.

While we need to broadly get most of our farming decisions "right", it's the weather and currently external factors that will decide our success.

It's right then that in years of plenty we should give to support those who have had a year of poorer fortune.
l think one only fully realises how lucky we are to have the NHS, when you really need it, l have had my moneys worth, 1,000's of times over.
The NHS, is a bottomless money pit, you could never give it enough. But while the nurses etc, are fantastic, the management is crap, and the amount of money just wasted, is appalling.

And if you really need help, and get on the system, it provides a basic income, and when you become old, it does house you, it might not be brilliant, but its a lot better than nothing.

And success at farming, is best looked at, by making more right decisions, than wrong ones.
 
Last edited:

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
So far I have not really needed much NHS treatment. Thats not really something in my mind. More that, should the rug be pulled from under any of us, there is a system there to ensure that we have our basic needs met to get back in our feet. As with all services, there is always more that could be done. Id not want to take money from X public service to pay for Y. Its just worth knowing that everything turned to crap tomorrow, my family would neither starve; be homeless; die of a treatable disease etc. So really whats the worst that can realistically happen?
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
So far I have not really needed much NHS treatment. Thats not really something in my mind. More that, should the rug be pulled from under any of us, there is a system there to ensure that we have our basic needs met to get back in our feet. As with all services, there is always more that could be done. Id not want to take money from X public service to pay for Y. Its just worth knowing that everything turned to crap tomorrow, my family would neither starve; be homeless; die of a treatable disease etc. So really whats the worst that can realistically happen?
l will add, that l really wish, l hadn't needed the NHS, but l can't, all issues pretty well caused by hard work, rather than 'health', so some small comfort !
 

farmbrew

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Notts
I look forward to harvest but also dread it. So much to go wrong. I sit on the edge of the seat tapping my foot with nerves, no radio, I just listen to the old girl for any warning signs of impending breakdown. Often forget to eat and drink and air con always dehydrates me. It is however the best job on the farm when its going well. Every field finished is a victory and the satisfaction in overcoming breakdowns etc is great. It is my last day cutting today, poor yields on dry limestone but on the plus side there are no storage issues and no drying....that really is the worst job on the farm.
We're all in it together to some extent, some have lovely new machinery, some have old stuff which is a constant job to maintain, some rely on contractors...there is stress involved in all of it.
Happy harvest:)
 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

  • Yes, Red tractor increase my stress and anxiety

    Votes: 282 98.3%
  • No, Red tractor gives me peace of mind that the product I produce is safe to enter the food chain

    Votes: 5 1.7%

HSENI names new farm safety champions

  • 117
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
Top