Have some of that Chris Packham

Discussion in 'Agricultural Matters' started by Yosemite Sam, Oct 6, 2018.

  1. MX7

    MX7 Member

    Location:
    cotswolds
    If one wants to ignore trolls,press on their name /avatar, then press ignore on their profile page.(y)(y)
     
  2. SLA

    SLA Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    I do find the rubbish they spout interesting, it shows what utter rubbish is being spread as fact and influencing people who don’t know any better, it really makes me wonder what as an industry we can do to put some balance back
     
    Osca and Storeman like this.
  3. 7610 super q

    7610 super q Member

    Location:
    Crapweathershire
    You got that bit right. I'm going to do what I bloody well like on land I've paid a mortgage for. If you want to see something different done with the land, you can buy it from me.
     
    BredRedHfd, lim x, Storeman and 2 others like this.
  4. Fallowfield

    Fallowfield Member


    It might help if you clarified which industry you are referring to.

    Are you referring to farming, or to the shooting industry?

    Most farmers are either indifferent or well disposed towards birds of prey. For the most part they don't affect their operations. It's the shooting industry that is the problem.
     
  5. Fallowfield

    Fallowfield Member


    What if wants to post telling others not to post?

    Weird.
     
  6. Fallowfield

    Fallowfield Member


    Still using DDT then?

    Shooting buzzards?

    Leaving carcasses about?

    Spreading raw sewage?

    Doing what you bloody well like?

    Or are you farming within the rules and regulations imposed by ignorant twits?
     
  7. 7610 super q

    7610 super q Member

    Location:
    Crapweathershire
    Never done any of the above. You really are a piece of work.
     
  8. Cowabunga

    Cowabunga Member

    Location:
    Ceredigion,Wales
    Please learn the basics of how to quote properly. It's not rocket science and is a darned site easier than understanding interacting lifecycles, which you obviously have even less clue about.

    Top predators prey on more than one species and as long as there are plenty of a single nutritious species left they will prey on that. Very like humans do actually and you lay the blame on them for most things it seems to me.

    There is no loss of habitat. There are more wildlife reserves, uncultivated borders and valleys and woodlands managed for wildlife than there has been since before the First World War. Less agricultural chemicals and fertilisers used on less cultivated land than since the 1930's, fertilisers and chemicals since the 1960's.
    The only things that there are more of, and that is a result of farmers doing more than their fair share, is top level predators. What do those raptors eat? They are not vegans, believe me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
    Lofty1984, texelburger, lim x and 7 others like this.
  9. SLA

    SLA Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Let’s actually look at what has changed in the last 60 years
    -urban development/sprawl
    -infrastructure development
    -industrial development
    -human population
    -cat population
    -dog population
    -garden/allotment use/management

    When the impact of the above has been analysed and monitored to the extent agriculture has then we might start getting somewhere.
     
    lim x, primmiemoo, MrNoo and 6 others like this.
  10. Cowabunga

    Cowabunga Member

    Location:
    Ceredigion,Wales
    1. DDT was used up until the 1960's when its persistence was recognised, mainly in relation to bird's eggs. It is not generally used in agriculture but is used in limited applications in Africa, mainly as a household insecticide where the balance of benefits to humans is very positive and it saves thousands of lives annually.

    2. Carcasses are not left about and it is a criminal offence to do so in the EU. Farmers are not even allowed to bury dead animals even though pets and millions of humans are buried annually and all of nature's animals die and rot naturally.

    3. Raw sewage is not allowed to be spread in the UK. Treated sewage can be by specialist contractors that must test the product and the land for pollutants such as heavy metals. Indeed the only way to get rid of human sewage is to treat is and use it as fertiliser where possible, as it is certainly frowned upon to pump it into the oceans.
    If a truly organic agriculture was to be demanded, then all human sewage and animal waste would have to be recycled to the land as fertiliser. That's just the way nature works.

    4. Better that farmers do what they like within a framework of good husbandry rather than allow ignorant tossers to decide for them.

    5. While some farmers, just like some businesspeople and some workers can be feckless, there are fewer and fewer of them these days due to a combination of education, economics, pride in their work and their environment and peer pressure.
     
    Osca, lim x, bracken basher and 5 others like this.
  11. SLA

    SLA Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    It’s quiet an interesting thread when you ignore the trolls, cheers @MX7 (y)
     
    Sharpy and MX7 like this.
  12. MX7

    MX7 Member

    Location:
    cotswolds
    If all posters did game over for the troll.
     
  13. Ffermer Bach

    Ffermer Bach Member

    maybe because, it was government policy to remove hedges and encourage farmers to do that, so large fields became the norm (culturally, as well as economically) and once government pressure causes culture to change, it is hard to change it back, therefore legislation was needed to make a 180 degree about turn in ideas. Agriculture being in many ways a traditional system (I do or THINK this, because my father did, as did his father!) when government prioritises production above all else, farmers continue to do or think that, even when government priorities change.
     
  14. Fallowfield

    Fallowfield Member


    The point is you can't do what you bloody well like on your land.

    You operate within the rules.

    And the rules were imposed by ignorant twits who live in towns.

    The question you should be asking is why the ignorant twits who live in towns thought they had to impose those rules.

    Why wouldn't they let farmers do what they wanted?
     
  15. Ffermer Bach

    Ffermer Bach Member

    also point of interest, somewhere here I have a copy of the enclosures act, for the top of the farm, so I guess if we go back far enough, a lot of hedges did not exist, and were planted by landowners (lucky that then there was not such a big conversation lobby, as I can imagine "stop planting hedges in our lovely open countryside")
     
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  16. Fallowfield

    Fallowfield Member


    I'll just leave that speak for itself.
     
  17. Fallowfield

    Fallowfield Member


    Another question you should be asking is just what the place would be like if the ignorant twits/tossers who live in towns hadn't introduced all those rules and regulations and farmers had been allowed to do what they wanted, governed only by the iron rule of having to make a profit in order to survive.
     
  18. SLA

    SLA Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Unfortunately these threads can come up on google searches so it’s always worth balancing the BS for a while, then ignoring them, let’s be honest after about the second post they do a good job of making them selves look like muppets with out any help from the rest of us:D(y)
     
    Osca, wrenbird and Storeman like this.
  19. joe soapy

    joe soapy Member

    Location:
    devon

    when hedges were first done they were kept to small fields because it was too much work to carry the stones any distance, in areas without stones the fields are generally much larger.
    most of our main were at 40 acres except around the yard
     
    Osca likes this.
  20. Cowabunga

    Cowabunga Member

    Location:
    Ceredigion,Wales
    Yes, it must surprise you. Where do you assume any loss of habits is lost to? Any habitat that is lost these days tends to be for roads and building development while habitats on farmland comes and goes over time and land rotation etc as it always has done but is actually gaining in area every year both by famers voluntarily leaving some less productive areas for economic reasons to benign neglect or to less intensive management, sometimes encouraged by some official schemes. Thousands of acres are under some kind of environmental schemes alone and tens of thousands of acres are just not farmed as intensively as they used to be for economic reasons.

    Your ignorance of such matters is nothing short of astonishing, however personally I have met plenty of wallies in all walks of life so it's not so surprising really. The really ridiculous thing is that people like you have a voice these days and, to make an apt analogy with nature, birds of a feather flock together. You are wasting your time here though, because you are actually talking with people who are intelligent, have practical experience and who basically don't tolerate much shite.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018

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