Hedge cutting

AgriiMark

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Worcestershire
The chap who normally does our hedges has left to go to NZ. I fancy giving it ago but after advice please. Start from the ground and work up? How many passes and average speed? Majority of hedges only have a years growth so just a tidy up.
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
I always take the top off first and then do the sides, starting at the top and working down.
Angle the sides out a bit so it's wider at the bottom - the bottoms of hedges don't grow as much as the tops. Depending on the tractor, you'll want to be in the lowest gears.
If you've not done any before, start in the slowest gear you've got - it'll give you more time to master working 4 levers with your left hand like some demented pianist(y)
 

ARW

Member
Location
Yorkshire
What tractor are you putting it on?
When you get the hang of it start on the shoulder, then you can see the cutting line on the top of the hedge. Always take the thick off the top first then you can see where to cut and it will make a better job. Also doing the shoulder first, then when you do the bottom you just match it up with the bottom of the cut on the shoulder, this gives a good even cut on the sides, if you start at the bottom you could go to far in and male it look untidy.
A sharp flail is the only way to cut a hedge
 

BDBed

Member
Location
Melton Mowbray
What tractor are you putting it on?
When you get the hang of it start on the shoulder, then you can see the cutting line on the top of the hedge. Always take the thick off the top first then you can see where to cut and it will make a better job. Also doing the shoulder first, then when you do the bottom you just match it up with the bottom of the cut on the shoulder, this gives a good even cut on the sides, if you start at the bottom you could go to far in and male it look untidy.
A sharp flail is the only way to cut a hedge

+1 for this (y)
 

AgriiMark

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Worcestershire
Spearhead 565 excel on the back of a case mx135. So say i was taking 6 inches off for example in my first pass take 4 inches then second take 2 at a slower speed would i make it look half decent [emoji23]
 

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
Spearhead 565 excel on the back of a case mx135. So say i was taking 6 inches off for example in my first pass take 4 inches then second take 2 at a slower speed would i make it look half decent [emoji23]

If you’ve got the time and the patience then yes. You might not have the luxury of another pass if it’s wet though.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
Spearhead 565 excel on the back of a case mx135. So say i was taking 6 inches off for example in my first pass take 4 inches then second take 2 at a slower speed would i make it look half decent [emoji23]
Crack on in one go. If its 1 years growth I aim to do it all in 1 pass. 2 years would require a second pass.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
1 pass is hard work I think, bray the hedge off as fast as you can then finish it off with ease. Only 1 pass on the sides. Depends how strong your hedges are
Maybe its false economy but I just want to get done and go home, and I don't think any of my hedges look much worse than others in the vicinity.
 

Ali_Maxxum

Member
Location
Chepstow, Wales
I always do the side first, that way you aren't over hanging the corner nearest you and unnecessarily over lapping, similar to what ARW said you can see the top line then, rough pass then another to tidy up, possibly a floor pass if there's brambles/lambs.

Single year black thorn hedges I can comfortably cut with one pass by going a gear slower.

I used to do the shoulder first but found it was of no real benefit for in field hedges.. Most of what we do the bottoms are totally eaten out by sheep or horses anyway. All my roadside work I take the shoulder off last to keep it back off the road, plus I don't like square box hedges.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
9394A9FB-B1D4-4597-A8B8-706188E49E92.jpeg
Do mine?
 

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AHDB planting and variety survey

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The AHDB Planting and Variety Survey provides the earliest view of the planted area for the upcoming harvest in the United Kingdom (UK).​


Complete the Planting and Variety Survey

The survey will estimate the area of cereals and oilseed rape intended for harvest in 2022 in the UK. It aims to assess the varietal composition of wheat, barley, oats and oilseed rape crops in the UK. The results of this survey will allow the industry to quantify domestic production, at a time when food security is more important than ever.
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