Horse Drinkers

Discussion in 'Rural Diversification' started by Rod Dumbreck, Jun 12, 2019 at 11:52 AM.

  1. Does anyone have horse drinkers in their livery stables, are they a good idea, or is a 2 gallon bucket the answer?



    Thanks for you comments
     
  2. Farmer996

    Farmer996 Member

    Location:
    North East
    They are good for saving water. A lot gets wasted with buckets. Horses have a knack of knocking them over, pooing in them, dropping feed & bedding in, etc. Liveries also like wasting water when they use buckets. They will empty out perfectly good water and re-fill. The only problem with drinkers is that they freeze in winter and can flood the stables when they thaw. I turn the water off and empty them if it's going to be sub zero which a bit of a pain, especially if you get several short cold spells in a row.
     
    Rod Dumbreck likes this.
  3. Dry Rot

    Dry Rot Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    I don't do liveries but agree with F996. And water in Scotland is free!
     
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  4. Farmer996

    Farmer996 Member

    Location:
    North East
    I'm moving to Scotland!
     
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  5. Farmer996

    Farmer996 Member

    Location:
    North East
    Don't scrimp on the fixings if you do go for it. Some horses will rub their backsides on them. We've only had one come off but it flooded the stable with a lot of bucket's worth! If fixing to chipboard, screw another (non-chip) board over it first.
     
  6. Dry Rot

    Dry Rot Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    You might change your mind. Lots do! Not too bad here but I believe the annual rainfall in, for example, the Fort William area is around 1800mm per annum -- and you get midges thrown in as a bonus!:LOL:
     

  7. Thanks for your reply, we have spring water, so pay but in different way.
    How do you empty them, and do they stay fairly clean?
     
  8. oakleaf

    oakleaf Member

    We use these. Havent any bother with them and they're in 10 years now . Never had one scratched off even rare enough to be dunged in. 20190613_182913.jpg
     
  9. Farmer996

    Farmer996 Member

    Location:
    North East
    To empty them, I turn the water off then use a tin cup to scoop the water out into a bucket held underneath. If they have a plug on the bottom, don't take them out to drain or they can leak when you put them back in.

    As for cleaning, they should be checked every day. Horses can poo in them and feed/bedding still ends up in there. It depends on the horse. Some can go a few weeks without cleaning. Some are messy and it needs doing every couple of days. Pretty easy to do though and only takes a minute. Leave the water on and empty with cup and bucket as above until water runs clean. Can also use an old bit of sponge or a scourer if the bowl itself gets grubby. We get the liveries to do their own but they often don't check so you'll need to keep on top of them.
     
    Rod Dumbreck likes this.
  10. 4course

    4course Member

    Location:
    north yorks
    Horses wont drink dirty water even what theve slobbered in themselves unless desperate so no drinkers here, plus a sudden intake of water can induce a colic, those renting stables even for there own horse cannot be trusted to clean drinkers daily. Taps/ pipes are terrible for waste as they switch on then bugger off to fill a hay net or gossip,have found the simplest way is an ipc raised above bucket height with a ball cock fitted and a largish diameter outlet so they can fill buckets/tubs with clean water in seconds also usually get away with a frost . we insist on 2 smaller receptacles so they can carry them without spilling or tipping some out and if placed apart should the horse muck them there is another available
    there are some tipping drinkers available im sure I saw them at a horseshow , need to be over a drain in stable and still the cleanings got to be done daily so no advantage on a mixed yard
     
  11. Farmer996

    Farmer996 Member

    Location:
    North East
    Never heard of colic being induced from drinkers. How does a horse get a sudden intake of water from them? All our stables had them fitted when we bought the place 12 years ago so we've just adapted to using them. Ipc idea sounds good. I have two on a mezzanine floor above the stables that I was thinking of using for a backup supply. Might be a plan for winter bucket filling or other uses. Not 100% sure what you mean though. Got any pics? 2 smaller bucket plan is also a good one. Lost count of the amount of times I've seen big buckets spilled, messed in or knocked over! Tipping ones look good but a bit pricey..
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019 at 7:49 PM
  12. 4course

    4course Member

    Location:
    north yorks
    intake of water due to horse not drinking as water dirty then gorging itself once offered clean and as its only got a small stomach then forcing dry food through causing a blockage/swelling of food in the intestine or at least "tummy "ache i.e colic .
    the ipc pipe is bigger than a hose or ordinary tap so we attatch a flexible tube, ( fabric fire hydrant hose works for us)
     
  13. Farmer996

    Farmer996 Member

    Location:
    North East
    Ah, I see what you mean. So as long as they are checked and cleaned out regularly then it shouldn't be an issue? We only have 8 liveries so it's fairly easy to keep on top of. But then if they mess them up overnight, will they gorge themselves in the field the next day or when the drinker is cleaned out in the morning?
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019 at 8:34 PM
  14. 4course

    4course Member

    Location:
    north yorks
    a few hours with dirty water is not life threatening though best avoided ,its more the folks who on diy when stabled 24/7 just glance in a drinker see water and think its fine thats the problem ,livery is a different thing to renting someone a stable/grazing
     
    Farmer996 likes this.
  15. one of the "liveries" is my wife and its a dickens of a job keeping on top ......
     
    Jameshenry likes this.
  16. 4course

    4course Member

    Location:
    north yorks
    in that case you are on dangerous ground !!
     
    Rod Dumbreck likes this.

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