how much are you REDUCING N rates????

With the current explosion in fert prices how much N is everyone putting on their Spring barley and wheat and how much do they plan to reduce it to this year?

Spring barley 2020 139kg N/ha
2021 112kg N/ha

wheat 2020 215kg N/ha
2021 175kg N/ha
 
Winter wheat had 2cwt an acre last year.
I’ve currently got 2 bags in stock for next year so that might have to be split over 40 acres and the grassland go without.
Must have a word with contractor, see what his thoughts are of going on the wheat with the umbilical
 

Grass And Grain

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Yorks
Bought at a sort of reasonable price, so theoretically economic to use normal rates at current grain prices.

That said, suppose could sell it on for a profit. How does that work? Are there any rules to stop is selling it? Don't know.

So maybe it's worth say £550/t even though I paid less than that. Therefore pull rates back 40kgN/ha and sell the surplus. In practice, don't suppose I'll bother to do that, hope everyone reduces rates a bit, and profit from even higher grain prices.

From a world perspective, suppose it depends how many factories have reduced output, and therefore if that N isn't available, so lower N rates and yields.

One thing that's probable - on average, rates won't be higher than normal, and probably lower. But if grassland farmers use lower rates, then they may need to buy more grain to supplement = higher grain prices.
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Bought at a sort of reasonable price, so theoretically economic to use normal rates at current grain prices.

That said, suppose could sell it on for a profit. How does that work? Are there any rules to stop is selling it? Don't know.

So maybe it's worth say £550/t even though I paid less than that. Therefore pull rates back 40kgN/ha and sell the surplus. In practice, don't suppose I'll bother to do that, hope everyone reduces rates a bit, and profit from even higher grain prices.

From a world perspective, suppose it depends how many factories have reduced output, and therefore if that N isn't available, so lower N rates and yields.

One thing that's probable - on average, rates won't be higher than normal, and probably lower. But if grassland farmers use lower rates, then they may need to buy more grain to supplement = higher grain prices.
or just keep less livestock = higher prices for us and less demand for grain = lower grain prices
 

Top Tip.

Member
Location
highland
But if grassland farmers use lower rates, then they may need to buy more grain to supplement = higher grain prices.

Grassland farmers can’t afford to keep stock at these prices!!
 
With the current explosion in fert prices how much N is everyone putting on their Spring barley and wheat and how much do they plan to reduce it to this year?

Spring barley 2020 139kg N/ha
2021 112kg N/ha

wheat 2020 215kg N/ha
2021 175kg N/ha

With wheat being £40 per tonne higher than several months ago is it even cost effective to reduce? Case of penny wise, pound stupid?
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
With the current explosion in fert prices how much N is everyone putting on their Spring barley and wheat and how much do they plan to reduce it to this year?

Spring barley 2020 139kg N/ha
2021 112kg N/ha

wheat 2020 215kg N/ha
2021 175kg N/ha

Why don't we flip it around a bit? How much of your normal npk requirements have you bought and what's your cost per unit Npk? Because not everyone is buying all their needs at prevailing prices.
 

Grass And Grain

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Yorks
or just keep less livestock = higher prices for us and less demand for grain = lower grain prices
Like the way you've reversed what I said. Fair comment!

You can do that on individual farm level, and maybe cull breeding stock harder, also maybe less pigs and poultry in the country/world.

Will many less calves or lambs will be born? Don't know. If they're alive, they'll need feeding.

It's a problem.

So much for reducing N fert for greenhouse gas emissions. Soon as world is short of N and food, everyone will start screaming PRODUCE MORE N FERTILISER.

Guess it affects people and countries who can't afford high food prices.
 

Jim75

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Easter ross
You must be going all out for feed at those N rates on Barley. Been aiming for 100kg on malting, probably up it if anything to 110-115. Lots of stock/manure in the mix so still on the high side at times.
New to wheat this year but probably go in at 190kg. N was bought sensible this yr, P and K on the high side but plenty muck in the mix with ability to use every kilo this year spread over as wide an area as possible.
 
Bought at a sort of reasonable price, so theoretically economic to use normal rates at current grain prices.

That said, suppose could sell it on for a profit. How does that work? Are there any rules to stop is selling it? Don't know.

So maybe it's worth say £550/t even though I paid less than that. Therefore pull rates back 40kgN/ha and sell the surplus. In practice, don't suppose I'll bother to do that, hope everyone reduces rates a bit, and profit from even higher grain prices.

From a world perspective, suppose it depends how many factories have reduced output, and therefore if that N isn't available, so lower N rates and yields.

One thing that's probable - on average, rates won't be higher than normal, and probably lower. But if grassland farmers use lower rates, then they may need to buy more grain to supplement = higher grain prices.
But if grassland farmers use lower rates, then they may need to buy more grain to supplement = higher grain prices

theres a good point, is it cheaper to buy fert for grass or substitute with a bit of barley?
 
You must be going all out for feed at those N rates on Barley. Been aiming for 100kg on malting, probably up it if anything to 110-115. Lots of stock/manure in the mix so still on the high side at times.
New to wheat this year but probably go in at 190kg. N was bought sensible this yr, P and K on the high side but plenty muck in the mix with ability to use every kilo this year spread over as wide an area as possible.
you think my rates are high? they include compound n down the spout at drilling for the sb, what sort of sb yields are you achieving with 100kg N/ha?
 

beardface

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Yorkshire
Bought at a sort of reasonable price, so theoretically economic to use normal rates at current grain prices.

That said, suppose could sell it on for a profit. How does that work? Are there any rules to stop is selling it? Don't know.

So maybe it's worth say £550/t even though I paid less than that. Therefore pull rates back 40kgN/ha and sell the surplus. In practice, don't suppose I'll bother to do that, hope everyone reduces rates a bit, and profit from even higher grain prices.

From a world perspective, suppose it depends how many factories have reduced output, and therefore if that N isn't available, so lower N rates and yields.

One thing that's probable - on average, rates won't be higher than normal, and probably lower. But if grassland farmers use lower rates, then they may need to buy more grain to supplement = higher grain prices.

Livestock farmers will just reduce numbers in short term and restock with homebred stock or buy in when fert/grain price drops again if they rely on it in their system. Trouble with dropping N rates in arable is it reduces carry over in the soil to the next crop. So bit of a vicious cycle if higher feet prices are here to stay.

It makes 2 year legume fallows and other environmental options viable for most. Funny how this plus the obvious reduction in stock numbers is going in govs favour........
 

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

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Applying principles of regen ag can incur a range of on-farm challenges. Learn how innovative tools & machinery can help with these hurdles.

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