How well does the spun on wheat look? Are fert spreaders accurate enough?

This was even rougher. This picture shows where we gave up because the volunteer oats were causing quite a few lumps. What we did is fine, although more black-grass than our mid September no-till wheat though. I think I'm glad I didn't do too much more.

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I would still say though, I think we were right to stop here on this field. Lower down more in the valley with slightly nicer soil the plant population is decent, but it was petering out as we went up the hill. Rest of the field is now spring wheat. Will be interesting to compare margins.
 

Bman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cambs Essex
Skyscraper broadcasted on and nz harrowed in
 

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ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Our spun on into cultivated land looks okay, but no till done around the same time looks better. Pleased we did it, but if we hadn’t cultivated and bought up blackgrass it would have been no tilled earlier and be much better. We created the problem for ourselves.
 

Andy26

Moderator
Arable Farmer
Location
Northants
I'll get some photos. There is one field, the last we did, that is a bit of a disaster, but that's really unrelated to this method because this field has a very serious drainage problem that we have been trying to cure for years. So striking that out, I'd say we've got some crops that could well yield in the 8-10t range. I'd be disappointed if they did less than 7.5t. Also did some winter barley, which is looking noticeably slightly worse than drilled winter barley that went in at the same time. I have a slight question over hare damage that might have altered the picture a bit.

We then bought a very old NZ as well to get spring seedbeds with, and I think probably we should have just gone straight to that rather than the Cultus (although Cultus did take out the tractor wheelings well). The latter left the odd line where the last tine went through creating a trench that then was covered with the star wheels / batter board things. Overall this is not much worse than some gaps on wide spaced drills, and overall the plant population is more uniform due to the broadcasting.

Overall I'm glad I did it, and would do it again, but would probably use an NZ. Because the tractor could run with v low pressures, unlike some of these mounted drills, we have a good plant even round the headlands, whereas I've seen some fields done late with mounted drills with more obvious wheelings and headland compaction.
NZ is the tool, seen some leave their KV tine drill in the shed and broadcast and NZ in.

Will be interested what story the combine tells.
 

Farm Xport

Member
Trade
Location
Worldwide
I'll get some photos. There is one field, the last we did, that is a bit of a disaster, but that's really unrelated to this method because this field has a very serious drainage problem that we have been trying to cure for years. So striking that out, I'd say we've got some crops that could well yield in the 8-10t range. I'd be disappointed if they did less than 7.5t. Also did some winter barley, which is looking noticeably slightly worse than drilled winter barley that went in at the same time. I have a slight question over hare damage that might have altered the picture a bit.

We then bought a very old NZ as well to get spring seedbeds with, and I think probably we should have just gone straight to that rather than the Cultus (although Cultus did take out the tractor wheelings well). The latter left the odd line where the last tine went through creating a trench that then was covered with the star wheels / batter board things. Overall this is not much worse than some gaps on wide spaced drills, and overall the plant population is more uniform due to the broadcasting.

Overall I'm glad I did it, and would do it again, but would probably use an NZ. Because the tractor could run with v low pressures, unlike some of these mounted drills, we have a good plant even round the headlands, whereas I've seen some fields done late with mounted drills with more obvious wheelings and headland compaction.
What do you use to install drainage?
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
NZ is the tool, seen some leave their KV tine drill in the shed and broadcast and NZ in.

Will be interested what story the combine tells.
The wheat looks better after the KV TS here, so I will use that in the future, if it will go. But we tine in with a Terrano which isn't exactly the best tool for the job.
 
Just cut the last of the fields we spun on. Overall, especially when compared to the spring wheat, a very worthwhile exercise given the spring wheat is 2t/ha less ish and full of ergot. In fact, the wheat spun on some land which had had two winter bean crops in a row was our highest yielding field on the farm pretty much.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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