1. Farming Needs your Support

    Part 5 of the series launched today. Please share the message of support for farming on social media click the image above to share on Facebook - click here to support farming

    Dismiss Notice

I remember the time when...

Discussion in 'Agricultural Matters' started by Landless Gentry, Apr 10, 2019.

  1. Tarw Coch

    Tarw Coch Member

    Yes, I’m sure there’s a bit of exaggeration there but none the less, 2 1/4 cwt sacks were common and men used to carry them on a regular basis, it was part of the job. No doubt your average farmer/farm worker was much stronger and fitter then than now and no doubt some of them felt the ill effects of shifting such weight.
    As I mentioned earlier, the tale my late uncle told of the men putting 2 56llb weights in a 2 1/4 cwt sack to see what he was made of, he didn’t say it was easy, it was sheer bloody determination not to give in that got him to the top of the granary steps and I got the impression they’d picked on him as the strongest man there and that none of the others gave it a go.
     
    Dry Rot and ollie989898 like this.
  2. primmiemoo

    primmiemoo Member

    Location:
    Devon

    Asses' milk's worth a fortune, though.

    Only from the Jills, though.
     
  3. Av Gorritt

    Av Gorritt Member

    Location:
    NE Ches / SE Lancs
    The receiving man on the dairy deck was a bit of an artist in his own right . a good experienced "sniffer" could tell you whether it was night's milk or morning's , whether you had changed to silage from hay , what breed of cows you kept , and a whole lot more . I don't suppose he could have got as far as the colour of your Grandma's hair . But nearly I think .
     
    mf298, Al R, jre and 4 others like this.
  4. Forage Trader

    Forage Trader Member

    Location:
    Ceredigion
  5. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    I cannot think why it was not used more widely :rolleyes:
     
  6. Kidds

    Kidds Member

    Location:
    Warrington
    I remember talking to possibly the strongest man I ever knew, a friend of mine that was older than me. He said one of the strongest men he ever knew and worked with was my grandfather.
    It's easy to make your Dad out to be more than maybe he really was, rose tinted glasses, idolisation etc, but my Dad was bloody strong. He never stopped, I'm there sweating buckets and gasping for breath and he just kept going. I'm not talking about me as a kid but in my 30's and doing my best to make sure nobody can keep up with me, I still couldn't keep up with Dad (and no doubt he was nearly killing himself making sure I couldn't).
    I'd like to think a bit has rubbed off on me, I'd also like to think my lad will look up to me in the same way ( I think he probably does). Funny thing is that I now work for him at times and by God it nearly kills me making sure I put on a good show. Him too of course trying to keep up. :D
     
    fredf, Al R, haggard143 and 3 others like this.
  7. Kidds

    Kidds Member

    Location:
    Warrington
    I remember the days when nearly every farm around here had an Irish man working and living on the farm. Living quarters was a shed you'd be shamed for putting a dog in these days. Not one of those men could stand up straight.
    Different times and damned glad of that!
     
    Al R, haggard143, ollie989898 and 2 others like this.
  8. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    It does seem as you get older, the ability to keep going inceases. I am certain I could not have begun to do the long distance cycling I do and also to keep going day on day when I was a young man.
    It wa a great pleasure as a father when my son was walking all over me on one long distance ride. It was even better to get past him in the final stretch and beat him;)
     
  9. unlacedgecko

    unlacedgecko Member

    Location:
    North Lincolnshire
    Yeah stamina increases in late middle age. Most deca iron tri competitors are in their 40s/50s.
     
    ollie989898 likes this.
  10. ...when sugar beet were so valuable (about £13 tonne in 74 ish) that the only days your parents let you skip primary school were so that you could collect beet the single row Almer-Salmon missed..and a mars bar cost 3 and a half pence
     
    Cowcorn, ollie989898 and DrWazzock like this.
  11. My uncle who had been living abroad for a long time and hadn't been on a farm since the 50s if not before was watching me dag some lambs and couldn't understand why I wasn't picking up the shitty wool and putting it in a bag. I told him it was worthless and he couldn't believe it. Had spent his childhood picking up wool off the floor and off the fences to sell and watching his dad (my great grandfather) shearing dead ewes before burying them. Now it hardly covers the cost of shearing.
     
    mf298, Y Fan Wen, Al R and 1 other person like this.
  12. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    The bloke who thought that up wants shooting.
    My dad did baled silage once, he said it was murder. They reverted to buckraking into the pit after that.
     
  13. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Every farm here had a prisoner of war as well. Some until quite recently. Some even married into the family! Conditions were terrible for them initially, but they worked hard and did well.
     
    mf298, Al R and borderterribles like this.
  14. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    They didnt lift the 18 stone sacks, they would be loaded onto the mans back for him to carry.
    I wince when i look at stone granary steps and look at the wear on then
     
    Al R, Courier, haggard143 and 2 others like this.
  15. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    We always used to grow an acre of mangolds and had to get them hand lifted and pied down before the frosts. Then we used to put them through the root cutter during the winter and take two scuttles of them out to the ewes after lambing time.

    We still have the root cutter ( with a motor on it now) and we sometimes still use it to chop fodder beet for the cattle. I dont know why really, but it looks and feels good.
     
    ollie989898 likes this.
  16. I met a bloke a fair time ago who could could lift a grain shovel with me sat in it. I thought that was pretty impressive.

    To this day I still don't know how blokes used to handle those sacks all day. You might well have the muscle mass to do it but I can't see the human skeleton sticking that long term, they must have had aches and pains, ruptured discs, haemorrhoids and hernias galore.

    I don't know anything about olympic weight lifting but I would watch the worlds strongest man competition from time to time. The two axes thing was impressive. Outstretch your arms like you are on a crucifix and hold a big lump of metal the shape of an axe in each hand. Each weighed exactly 110kg. And you have to hold both of them up to pressure sensors for as long as you can. Mental.

    The other one that used to impress me was the lift and carry big, two blocks with a bar in each to grip. Each weighed 90kg.
     
    Al R likes this.
  17. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    It wasnt full time work, i am guessing one day per week over the winter as they thrashed.
     
  18. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Ex's mother was a retired nurse. Where she worked they saw more ruptures due to farm workers trying to pull cambridge roller pups to hitch up than any other cause. It was the angle of pull that did it. Most sacks were lifted on to mans back so it wasn't a dead lift.
     
    haggard143 and glasshouse like this.
  19. Ouch, that sounds nasty.

    In middle age, apparently if you try stunts like that it is not that hard to rupture or severe your Achilles tendon. Go careful you chaps.
     
  20. Same where I grew up. Quite a few still had and used the Nissen huts that had been erected to house the POWs. In our area they were mainly Italian, and it always surprised me how many hadn't gone back home after the war.
     
    ollie989898 likes this.

Share This Page