Identify the weed

Banj0Bolt

Member
Livestock Farmer
IMG-20210423-WA0006.jpg

I'd love to identify these as I want to spray them. I live in Ireland and the land would not be the best. They disappear in winter, and in summer they grow as high as the silage, no flowers on them.
 

the weed girls

New Member
It looks like a member of the polygonum family because it has ochrea. It looks like it spreads underground but it’s not clear if it is a wetland situation but I think it is wet/damp. It could be one of the bistorts or persicaria hydropiper?
 

Banj0Bolt

Member
Livestock Farmer
2,4D? RBH? I'm sorry I don't know what those are 😳
The area in question is wet for a few months of the year. The field was sprayed with Mortone a few years back for rushes, it put this unknown weed back but didn't seem to kill it.
 

Aceface

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I downloaded an app called "Scouting" (from Xarvio (?)) a few days ago and it will identify a weed or disease (and other stuff I have yet to try it on like N status) from a photo you take on your phone of whatever you need identifying. Alas, I took a screen photo of this thread and it couldn't do it.
 

the weed girls

New Member
You are in the right weed family. But does it spread underground? If you dig it up does it have long roots that give rise to new plants? Or is each plant an individual?
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer

Banj0Bolt

Member
Livestock Farmer
I don't think it is the common Redshank (Polygonum persicaria) but more likely Polygonum amphibia.
Very similar plant and control would be the same too.
What kind of herbicide might kill it? Without killing the grass
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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