Imploding vacuum tanker

Looking for wisdom, failing that ‘quick bodges and creations’.
Elderly but functional slurry tanker is beginning to implode.
If everything but the tank wasn’t working fine I’d probably scrap the thing but as it only gets occasional use for 3-4 loads at a time the sensible options are limited.
No point in buying a new one really and not enough work to call in a contractor.
I’m unlikely to be able to source a sensibly priced replacement tank ( unless anyone knows otherwise) which leaves one other option..
Can anyone think of an expanding foam/reinforcing layer of product that I could line the inside with to delay the decay?
Theoretically it’s just the rear dome that’s paper thin but I expect the main barrel won’t be far behind!
Loosing some volume is bearable.
Thanks
 

Wisconsonian

Member
Trade
Easiest thing to do is lower the suction, load slower, don't suck that last bit out, whatever it takes to reduce the vacuum.

Otherwise, I can't see any problem with adding some reinforcing stiffeners to the outside of the end, or even around the barrel, but hopefully it wouldn't come to that.

Inside you could plaster it, but that's pretty desperate. Add a lot of weight, for little strength, but at least it would be strong in compression to work with the steel.
 

Pan mixer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Near Colchester
A 'friend' had one that did implode a bit. Shutting the valve and blowing to pressurise the tank a bit got it to go back to where it was except for the myriad of holes around the worst imploded bit. Only using it for dirty water at the time but it went across the field looking like one of those water barrels in a western that had been shot by the bad guys.

I don't think there is enough pressure in one to actually cause the metal to shred but I would be wearing a hat and keep my mouth shut if walking by.
 

Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
A few years ago there was a mishap and my tanker ended up a little too close to a barn. It had a loading arm which hit the barn bent the arm and pushed it into the tank putting a dent into it. Dent was probably about 12 inches square. The insurance company wrote off the tank and had a new one put on the chassis as they deemed it too dangerous to run with a dent.

Bg
 
A few years ago there was a mishap and my tanker ended up a little too close to a barn. It had a loading arm which hit the barn bent the arm and pushed it into the tank putting a dent into it. Dent was probably about 12 inches square. The insurance company wrote off the tank and had a new one put on the chassis as they deemed it too dangerous to run with a dent.

Bg

I suppose technically it is a pressure vessel which brings in a raft of engineering and safety issues. Not something worth fooling around with.
 

bitwrx

Member
Pressure system safety regulations apply I believe. No specific knowledge, but I'd expect that periodic inspection by a competent person would be a requirement, and embargo of anything that doesn't look right would be mandatory. I think in terms of the regs, it's a case of of you have to ask, you already know the answer.

Out of interest, what is the max positive pressure the pump can deliver? What is the set point of the overpressure safety device? When was the last time it was tested?
 

Timbo

Member
Location
Gods County
Looking for wisdom, failing that ‘quick bodges and creations’.
Elderly but functional slurry tanker is beginning to implode.
If everything but the tank wasn’t working fine I’d probably scrap the thing but as it only gets occasional use for 3-4 loads at a time the sensible options are limited.
No point in buying a new one really and not enough work to call in a contractor.
I’m unlikely to be able to source a sensibly priced replacement tank ( unless anyone knows otherwise) which leaves one other option..
Can anyone think of an expanding foam/reinforcing layer of product that I could line the inside with to delay the decay?
Theoretically it’s just the rear dome that’s paper thin but I expect the main barrel won’t be far behind!
Loosing some volume is bearable.
Thanks

If the measly max-on-a-good-day of -15psi suction is causing it to implode, it is very likely to explode in blow mode. Scrap it before someone is hurt.
 

Make Tax Digital Software Poll

  • Quickbooks

    Votes: 33 16.6%
  • Sage

    Votes: 20 10.1%
  • Xero

    Votes: 92 46.2%
  • Other

    Votes: 54 27.1%

Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

  • 185
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
Top