"Improving Our Lot" - Planned Holistic Grazing, for starters..

Discussion in 'Holistic Farming' started by Kiwi Pete, Apr 21, 2018.

  1. err, I wasn't having a go at either PBH or Brisel, I thought we were on the same page

    & yes, I was having a dig at the anti American comments re "graze"
     
    holwellcourtfarm and Kiwi Pete like this.
  2. anyhoos . . .

    time for another video

    Nicole Masters ( Ive been to one of her talks, she is awesome ), Christine Su & Betsy Ross
    the first couple of minutes with the MC are a bit slow, but persevere

     
  3. no one likes Nicole ?
     
    holwellcourtfarm and Kiwi Pete like this.
  4. awkward

    awkward Member

    Location:
    kerry ireland
    It would be great to have some of these people give a seminar here but afraid too many closed minds.
     
    hendrebc and Karliboy like this.
  5. Come over for Groundswell next year, plenty of open minds there (y)
     
    hendrebc, martian, Samcowman and 2 others like this.
  6. Crofter64

    Crofter64 Member

    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    June 26-27th in Hertfordshire
     
    hendrebc, martian, ShooTa and 3 others like this.
  7. Poorbuthappy

    Poorbuthappy Member

    Location:
    Devon
    Apologies if this has been posted before, afraid I didn't watch all the vids when I was trying to catch up the thread, but I found this really interesting. Will be searching out some more like that with the practical advice and know how.

     
  8. awkward

    awkward Member

    Location:
    kerry ireland
    Great info in that for me has helped with some interpretation of pasture and farm management
     
    Kiwi Pete and holwellcourtfarm like this.
  9. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    I know @Kiwi Pete had asked about ground cover going into winter. The replies included "something to catch the snow!"

    Well I was out getting my monthly photos this morning after a bit of snow last night and a bit more wind. The back pasture has been grazed quite far down - obviously since even the buckbrush doesn't really have leaves left :facepalm: - but it makes it quite apparent how plants can act as wind catches for snow.

    Here you can see how just one sage can collect a little pile while all the grass behind it is still visible. IMG_3965.jpg


    And this little line of stripped buckbrush has little banks on the leeward side.
    IMG_3966.jpg
     
  10. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    I do .
    Just been having a few days that have been a bit lean on time, haven't really even been up to much on farm.
    Everything still seems to be still trucking, thistles especially :facepalm:
     
    hendrebc and Farmer Roy like this.
  11. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    20181111_160022.jpg Plantain in flower here. Amazing how many plants are in 1kg/ha. This is the remnants of last year's cover crop, hopefully we get the right conditions to get the cattle trampling some seed in, I'll broadcast about 5kg/ha of red clover on and mob them up tight.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Henarar

    Henarar Member

    Location:
    ZumerZet Somerset
    make a nice cow
     
    Kiwi Pete likes this.
  13. just to follow up with the vid that was linked - heres another.
     
    awkward, Kiwi Pete and Poorbuthappy like this.
  14. Treg

    Treg Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Surely letting the herd roam on all your farm is set stocking? He did mention adding fences later but isn't that just a brief history of farming?
    Also just increasing numbers is a sure way to fail long term, it's about judging numbers the land can take, this varies every year.
     
    hendrebc, Crofter64 and Henarar like this.
  15. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    That was (as always) a really enlightening video.
    Interesting his distinction between "fencing" and herding, I have been watching my bulls herding each other and it makes perfect sense... they have tremendous impact for that reason, for their liveweight and intake I don't know how they could be better for the purpose.
     
    hendrebc and Poorbuthappy like this.
  16. Poorbuthappy

    Poorbuthappy Member

    Location:
    Devon
    Not sure where the "roaming all your farm" bit comes from. He did say the cattle had 3 days in that paddock.
    But it was Savory's talk I was more interested in - and whilst he talked about increasing numbers - he was very much pushing the planning of grazing days bit.
     
    hendrebc, Farmer Roy and Kiwi Pete like this.
  17. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    These are probably technically still timeframe issues as opposed to animal numbers per se?
    We (due to fixed animal costs) much more driven to individual animal performance, for example what we can house has a bearing on many decisions, or how many cows we can milk, those type of constraints? (Prejudices)
    Whereas in a livestock trading / ranching sense, numbers could be more easily varied to suit the season than in a more intensive farming context.
    For example I would be more profitable stocking up now and trading them off to suit growth than sticking to 80 cattle for 12 months, that much is obvious, those 80 animals need then to be pampered to generate the same production per square mile or per head, which is generally where our focus lies (and that is a "set stocking rate") - maybe that is why some operations are eminently more profitable than others, as the carbon is cycled much cheaper than we can perhaps do in a "system"

    At the moment it would be much easier in my context to have 220 cattle gaining 1.1 per day than 100 gaining 2.5 each, on pasture alone, so I see where he is coming from.
    Unfortunately many of the man-made hurdles to keeping livestock make it an academic exercise!
     
  18. Treg

    Treg Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Sorry, Roaming all the farm was my words for leaving a herd graze the whole ranch with no fencing.
     
    Kiwi Pete likes this.
  19. Treg

    Treg Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    I get your approach to it Kp, from your posts it's put in as little work for highest return ( so you have time for family & doing other stuff, which is what we all should be trying to achieve), lots of stock in field for short time move on quickly & I think sometimes you have alot of stock but not all the time. Where as I took it he meant maintain those high stocking rates & keep increasing them.
    As a Organic farmer this rings alarm bells , most of the problems I see with modern farming is the intensity of numbers, most of the diseases we have in modern agriculture have always been around but by packing animals together these diseases seem more prevalent .
    He did mention rest periods but didn't come across as over worried because soil didn't need a break (can't quite remember the wording he used ) , to me it's not just about the soil or the grass , it's the interaction with the animals as well ( the soil web if you like ) so the break is needed to reduce worm burden on the cattle / sheep as well as plants being able to regenerate.
    Some of what he said in the Video I agree with less groups of cattle , intense grazing for short periods I already do .
    With most livestock farms I would of said the first thing needed to improve the whole "system " is fencing whether it's for paddock / mob or strip grazing not employing extra man power to move the herd & keep them in a area with dogs or men on horse back.
     
    Kiwi Pete and hendrebc like this.
  20. Treg

    Treg Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Please don't get me wrong @Poorbuthappy I found it interesting but as @Farmer Roy always says these videos are posted for us to discuss & by me maybe taking it slightly different & the rest of you replying speeds up the learning process for me & everyone else:)
     
    hendrebc, Poorbuthappy and awkward like this.

Share This Page