"Improving Our Lot" - Planned Holistic Grazing, for starters..

Discussion in 'Holistic Farming' started by Kiwi Pete, Apr 21, 2018.

  1. Crofter64

    Crofter64 Member

    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    I went to a funeral of a farmer today- 79 , still had his own herd of cows, died while working in the garden. Lots of farmers there , all a bit worried. Spring has not come, no blossoms on the trees, nothing leafed out yet, no one has planted anything as it is too cold and wet and most hay fields were wiped out by the thick ice that covered everything this winter. No one remembers having such long winter for ages. My paddocks look better than most , as I’ve already mentioned, and tomorrow I’m am letting the cows and sheep graze a few hours for the first time since November 18th. I had an uneasy feeling about this winter going into it and had purchased extra hay- I have used almost all of it- I have enough for about 2 weeks left but I want to keep it as a back up. So hee goes. I waited till the three leaf stage( just) but can wait no longer. 3 C outside.
     
  2. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    I like mess
    Mess is good
     
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  3. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    But you know that when it warms up it’s going to warm up @Crofter64. This week there’s finally trees getting leaves. It’s strange, how it feels so late in the spring, but it really isn’t. I keep thinking my grass should be farther along but really... the trees and ditches are only just getting going. My grass is actually probably farther ahead because it was so short the soil warmed up fast :ROFLMAO:

    I don’t know when seeding usually happens out there but here they aren’t really behind. They’re definitely not early and any turn in weather could make them late, but really it wasn’t that long ago you didn’t start seeding until May 15!

    It was April 26 I finished putting the chicken coop poop out in the front yard, so that’s not even three weeks yet. The straw is almost gone from sight!

    212465DD-CCD7-4205-970B-B0B44E554A10.jpeg

    I even mowed the small area around the house I mow. But now it looks like it needs it again :shifty:

    Not sure I’m going to have the time, or enough strawy stuff, to get it spread on the other pasture I really wanted done. Most of the winter bedding is well on its way to muddy, decomposing poop, not good residue. But I think I’m going to experiment with compost and manure teas on that part instead (y)
     
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  4. Benefits of being coastal :whistle::inpain:
     
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  5. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    Good hail before while I was feeding out, it actually feels quite brisk compared to summer. Hey ho.
     
  6. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    Liquid manure? This sounds interesting!

    What's your plan?
     
  7. Crofter64

    Crofter64 Member

    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    We’re at the 45 th parallel -quite a bit further south than you . So, we’re about a month late. Every year there is something weatherwise to panic people and it always turns out somehow. This year it’s the completely brown hayfields (alfalfa dominated) that the dairy farmers rely on and their inability to get o n the land to seed anything. You are right though. when it finally warms it’ll jump straight to hot.
     
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  8. martian

    martian DD Moderator

    Location:
    N Herts
    Stores do just fine. Had one mob we turfed out in mid Feb (that dry spell we had) onto winter barley volunteers and they grew at up to 1.5kg/day, made me realise that we can be a bit precious about what we think they need. They get a lot of variety too, gone from pasture as pictured onto a patch of heading blackgrass, sterile brome and phacelia at top of demo field...won't do them a lot of good, but I'll move them off it tonight and it saves getting the topper out. And it's diversity for the rumen bugs.

    As to your second question: do I look like the sort of person that has photos of cow pats on my phone?
     
  9. martian

    martian DD Moderator

    Location:
    N Herts
    As it happens, from the same spot, the very next day. I should have let them eat it further down, as I won't be able to get back till after Groundswell, but normally would leave more behind so it isn't checked too much and comes back quick 20190516_115935.jpg
     
  10. Answered your own question there: Yes :p:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
     
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  11. Oh yeah, there is a big aim for uniformity in Cropping fields etc, I agree
    It was just the grazing I was talking about really, not things in general
     
  12. Poorbuthappy

    Poorbuthappy Member

    Location:
    Devon
    Traditional contemporary thinking (If that's not a contradiction in terms!) is not to let anything go to seed. To top anything that was getting too far ahead (or mow).
    Even within that thinking however, it always seemed you'd lost the battle for the best grazing when it started to seed. And it was always a battle to try to keep it at that stage. Topping just seemed such a waste of time, diesel and grass to me.
    I'm no where near where I want to be with it this year, but still a very different mindset to grazing management. Lots more subdivision and higher residuals planned.
    But it takes lots of electric fence if your not to be moving loads of fences every day.
    Doesn't help that I've got a lot of grass keep with little or no fencing to start with, and not in a ring fence.
     
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  13. Blaithin

    Blaithin Member

    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Make a pail of manure tea, put it in a sprayer and go to town.

    I have a pile of neglected compost as well I can dig into.
     
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  14. lol your out looks like my in length @martian
    as for pats - yes my phone has too many sheep leavings... saw a cracker today.
     
  15. Samcowman

    Samcowman Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    Cow pats are really quite interesting when you get into them. I took the 3 year old investigating them last week.
    @martian are you going to be doing a pasture walk this year. I missed out last year. :cry:
     
  16. I'll probably kick myself but can anyone confirm what these are? They look like some kind of legume to me...

    IMG_20190514_163336494.jpg

    We have significant patches appearing in several places.

    Oh, and happy cows in a new field today...

    IMG_20190516_090540312_HDR.jpg

    Getting on ok with mobile trough
    IMG_20190516_090520070.jpg
     
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  17. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    Vetch.
     
  18. Agrispeed

    Agrispeed Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Looks like vetch to me. What was the mix?

    I have some growing wild here, and it spreads a little every year.
     
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  19. Kiwi Pete

    Kiwi Pete Member

    Location:
    Owaka, New Zealand
    No fencing isn't a huge handicap, I would rather a "blank canvas" than a heap of infrastructure in the wrong place for what you want to do.
     
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  20. Poorbuthappy

    Poorbuthappy Member

    Location:
    Devon
    I know what you mean but the issue is lots of hedges that aren't stockproof so have to be fenced. So that's 2 lots of fence - 1 either side of the hedge.
    Then subdivision can be thought about after that.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019 at 7:32 AM
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