"Improving Our Lot" - Planned Holistic Grazing, for starters..

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Combining the natural world with the manmade is really about the only way it seems a person can make it in agriculture. an example would be a farmer who only feeds his cattle bought grain vs a farmer who only feeds his cattle grass off of leased land.
The "man made" world as you put it is the natural world as we are part of nature and everything we do is in our nature to do, its no lesser a part of nature for man to fly to the moon than it is for a bear to sh1t in the woods.
We set what we do apart from the rest of nature at our own peril, we were created naturally and can be destroyed in the same way and the great scheme of things wouldn't bat and eyelid
 

Treg

Member
Location
Cornwall
I remember reading that in mid 20th c. a cow and an acre of land were worth about the same. That’s how young people got into farming for themselves: worked for someone else, got paid partly in cows, then bought or traded for land. A very balanced system. Now you have to compete with ‘long term investment ‘ and ‘planning permission’. Bonkers.
In 1991 we paid £1350/acre for this farm and was buying dairy cows for similar money , a finished beef animal wasn't far short of that figure either.
Cow and finished price is still about the same but land here is £10,000 - £20,000 .
 
I think most non farmers who buy land have too much money. The return is of interest but very much secondary. They are generally not stupid and willing to learn but nearly always misguided and ignorant of the laws of nature. Most will want to see it "tidy", so dead stalks of grass might not be acceptable. But these are the sort of people that could be educated into the new and better way of doing things. So for instance if your new neighbour "gets it", som farmer he/she and others like them could be a valuable ally in the next agricultural revolution if that's what this is.
 

texas pete

Member
Location
East Mids
In 1991 we paid £1350/acre for this farm and was buying dairy cows for similar money , a finished beef animal wasn't far short of that figure either.
Cow and finished price is still about the same but land here is £10,000 - £20,000 .
That's a very interesting stat...and quite similar in both timescale and values to a chunk our our place.

You can only really look at it by separating the ownership from the production, to make it make financial sense.

Value is also irrelevant unless you want to sell it...or are to be taxed on it by a hard up, fudgeed up government.
 

Treg

Member
Location
Cornwall
That's a very interesting stat...and quite similar in both timescale and values to a chunk our our place.

You can only really look at it by separating the ownership from the production, to make it make financial sense.

Value is also irrelevant unless you want to sell it...or are to be taxed on it by a hard up, fudgeed up government.
I've moved farm 4x and moved house 9x in my lifetime...so far! The value of the farm is always relevant (y)
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
Livestock Farmer
In 1991 we paid £1350/acre for this farm and was buying dairy cows for similar money , a finished beef animal wasn't far short of that figure either.
Cow and finished price is still about the same but land here is £10,000 - £20,000 .
In 2002 we paid £1760/acre for this place (50% reduction for being succession tenants & 50% reduction again for a 21 year overage clause).

Dad paid £650/acre for his place (again, as a succession tenant) in 1993.

Both now "valued" at well over £10k/acre. Madness!
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
Crikey, that is some going...I thought farming families just moved every few hundred years. :bag:
in the 'bad' old days, of big estates, and rented farms, people did move farms quite often, successful tenants, were left to continue, or offered a bigger farm, their sons, could well be offered a smaller farm elsewhere, another estate, if good were 'offered' a bigger one, could well be on another estate. Those big estates, had a vested interest, in good farming families, they needed them to prosper, for their own income.
there are some big estate around here, the tendency now is to share the land out, and let the farm house separate, also some estates have sold of some land/farms, never the good soil farms, only the shitty crap soil ones
 
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Treg

Member
Location
Cornwall
In 2002 we paid £1760/acre for this place (50% reduction for being succession tenants & 50% reduction again for a 21 year overage clause).

Dad paid £650/acre for his place (again, as a succession tenant) in 1993.

Both now "valued" at well over £10k/acre. Madness!
I bough this farm from my parents in 2008 for £8000 / acre so by both our figures land is more than doubling every 10 yrs .
Not a bad return & you can see why people look at it as a good investment.
 

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