Is farming an 'identity'

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
If you have someone to take it on after you then get on and let them.
If you don't have anyone to take over from you what the heck are you doing all that work for? Sell up or rent it out and enjoy life a bit more.
Not that I have taken my own advice of course but seriously contemplating it. It's complicated because I did pack up a few years back but used the money to start over on my own, most of the time it is a very cushy number but for a few months each year it is extreme. Unfortunately this year the extreme bit coincided with mum being ill, that has been a challenge to say the least!
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
I am a farmer there’s never been any chance of me being anything else. I’ve brainwashed my wife into it and I’m pushing my kids into it. I will be doing it until I can’t do it anymore a bit like my father and grandfather and the other relatives who kept farming rather than retired. Yes I’m a stereotype and very happy to be one.
 

Nearly

Member
Location
North of York
Its a funny one farming. I do consider it as part of my identity, but only a part. The "culture" of farming is pretty deeply ingrained especially in livestock regions, round here you can go into any pub and immediately spot the young farmers: jeans, dealer boots, big belt buckle, checked shirt...talking to the floor.
You can spot them with your eyes shut. Chatting about how many beacons and smelling of diesel and slurry. ;)
 

Jonp

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Gwent
I started farming when I was 54.
Bought 15 sheep and 4 calves. Was one of my best ideas. Am at the stage where I prefer the company of sheep and cattle to people. (Covid nailed my meagre social life anyway) .Have had a good engineering career and travelled the world and will now see out my days as a learner farmer. The farmers I know are lovely people, always helpful and always a good laugh...so I am happy to be identified as a farmer. Now 62.
 

carbonfibre farmer

Member
Arable Farmer
My old man, living his best life, on his 77th birthday at the weekend.
20220121_145836.jpg

He does as much or as little as he wants/feels like doing.
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
Is it really so wrong if your job is also your hobby? A lot who have mindless 9-5 jobs would aspire to having a hobby that allowed them to make a living (of sorts).

If I didn’t, generally, enjoy my job then I’d be looking to spend more time doing other things too. Each to their own.
Do you mean to tell us that you actually like sheep...? :woot:
 

Pan mixer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Near Colchester
None of my 3 children want to take on the farm, I am over 60 btw.

I really enjoy what I do, I don't see enough people to worry about what 'identity' I have. I can do as much as I choose for as long as I am able (I do have staff) why should I want to pack it in? one of these years I might get this farming job right.

All 3 children and their partners were on about their work this evening, to a greater or lesser extent they are all bored with it despite having quite good jobs - banker, teacher, civil servant, etc.
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
We had my son's girlfriend staying with us for three weeks ( it should have been a week) .She's a Londoner who is working in Manchester. She's very taken with our farming life now and has decided that there's alternatives to city life. Obviously it helps that the sun is shining and we are cropping rather than animals that need mucking out. But it's a good life and better if the young want to follow but of course you need money to do it.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
None of my 3 children want to take on the farm, I am over 60 btw.

I really enjoy what I do, I don't see enough people to worry about what 'identity' I have. I can do as much as I choose for as long as I am able (I do have staff) why should I want to pack it in? one of these years I might get this farming job right.

All 3 children and their partners were on about their work this evening, to a greater or lesser extent they are all bored with it despite having quite good jobs - banker, teacher, civil servant, etc.
I always find it quite sad when someone has built up a successful farm but their children don't want any part of running it.
Obviously you shouldn't force them, they should do whatever they want (and perhaps be glad they've had a good start in life) still sad though.

My dad was telling me the other day that the farmer who's parlour I learnt to milk in when I was a kid is selling his cows and renting out his ground as his children don't want to know. He was in the process of taking over from his dad when I started there while still at school in the 80's.
I don't suppose it will be a working farm again:(
 

quattro

Member
Location
scotland

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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