is growing soya the way forward??

I am watching countryfile and an agro chemist forecast there is going to be a huge increase in acreage of soya grown but will this lead to problems
by the way I know nothing about growing crops as me and my brother are small time farmers and are finishing soon
 

Simon Chiles

DD Moderator
Huge % increase will not take many acres....

.....maybe another 12?

Joking, but it's not going to be a mainstream crop.

The rise in Soya acreage has been astronomic. Gone are the days when I used to be the biggest Soya Bean grower in the country with 46 acres. The current acreage in the UK is some 5,000 acres which when you think it has risen from a couple of hundred a few years ago is some expansion. The reasons? Price of crop and huge demand. People looking for new break crops especially in the light of flea beetle damage in oil seed rape and withdrawal of seed treatments, and a spring sown crop that allows you to tackle black grass. Coupled with new varieties now on the scene and it’s starting to look attractive.
 

Jim Bullock

Never Forgotten
Honorary Member
The rise in Soya acreage has been astronomic. Gone are the days when I used to be the biggest Soya Bean grower in the country with 46 acres. The current acreage in the UK is some 5,000 acres which when you think it has risen from a couple of hundred a few years ago is some expansion. The reasons? Price of crop and huge demand. People looking for new break crops especially in the light of flea beetle damage in oil seed rape and withdrawal of seed treatments, and a spring sown crop that allows you to tackle black grass. Coupled with new varieties now on the scene and it’s starting to look attractive.
It's a crop we are really interested in growing, but I am not convinced we get enough sunshine in Worcestershire to ripen them. There have been some quite successful crops grown in Herefordshire but they have been on grade 2 free-draining land where they can get on early...
 

Simon Chiles

DD Moderator
It's a crop we are really interested in growing, but I am not convinced we get enough sunshine in Worcestershire to ripen them. There have been some quite successful crops grown in Herefordshire but they have been on grade 2 free-draining land where they can get on early...

Not quite sure what the getting on early bit of your post means. If you mean planting then you certainly mustn’t plant Soya early, it has a very vulnerable stage ( it has juicy cotyledons that the pigeons love ) that you need it to grow through fast. Once it’s got it’s true ( hairy) leaves it’s safe. Seeding depth is also critical as it has a fixed length hypocotyl.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
My understanding of soya is that like maize and other hot climate crops, it needs heat to perform. Cold wet years just don't suit it. This year we had long hot dry spells that would serve it well as long as you got it established well. Like maize, we need varieties that require less heat units IMO.
 

Simon Chiles

DD Moderator
Fair point, but I'd have thought it would make more sense to grow crops that suit the climate

What if you had a Soya Bean variety that suited the UK climate? These varieties that we grow were developed in the Ukraine. You couldn’t grow Soya that is grown in Brazil ( for example) in the UK as it isn’t suitable, it needs equal length of day and night so has to be grown near the equator. I think the bit that most people are missing is that there has been major leaps forward in Soya plant breeding, probably more so than any other crop lately.
 

multi power

Member
Location
pembrokeshire
What if you had a Soya Bean variety that suited the UK climate? These varieties that we grow were developed in the Ukraine. You couldn’t grow Soya that is grown in Brazil ( for example) in the UK as it isn’t suitable, it needs equal length of day and night so has to be grown near the equator. I think the bit that most people are missing is that there has been major leaps forward in Soya plant breeding, probably more so than any other crop lately.
That makes 100% sense
Bit like fresian v holstines
Fresians suit our climate but I'd say they would be pretty pointless somewhere that you could grow maize for fun
 

TomB

Member
Location
Wiltshire
Apparently that crop yielded a tonne to the acre. That crop looked exactly how I’d expect it too look.

So if a ton/acre is a typical yield what is the price/ton? A very quick google suggests US soy beans are not much more than twice the wheat price. Would need to be a good bit more than that to cover the risk? - but there must be some premium for U.K. grown?
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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