Is it time to look again at Nicotinoid dressings to control flea beetle.

Yale

Member
Livestock Farmer
With the massive issue of cooking oil supply world wide would it be prudent for the government to at least scrutinise any data since the ban to see if there is a genuine argument for the reintroduction of this seed dressing.

Surely this is an emergency measure which could be introduced which would allow UK farmers to actually harvest a crop for valuable use.

Did it affect bees and what results has the ban achieved?
 

Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
I planted 2 fields and one is now wheat.

Current strategy with osr is to spend as little money as possible until we know it’s established. Cheap seed, a little N no insecticide. If it establishes ok persevere if not don’t waste time rip it up and do something else. It’s not really sustainable but has not cost us a lot.

Government really needs to look at the effect regulation is having on food supply.

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farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
One thing you can be sure of, the government won’t be interested in any scientific facts 😡
Neither will Greenpeace... The have banned me from speaking truth on their social media campaigns to block emergency use in sugar beet with threads like "British government allow use of Bee killing pesticide" The comments that follow show how easy it is to mislead an ill informed populations. Educated comments like "Typical nasty torries, should spray it over parliament", "its all part of the addenda to control food supplies and depopulate us" OMG that is sooooo terrible, well gardeners can still choose not to use it cant they", "follow the money" "with is wrong with these people why don't they grow beetroot organically instead" Then the vegans roll in, as they do in any thread they possibly shoe horn their view into, and moan how bee keeping is slavery and eating honey is theft :rolleyes: :ROFLMAO: Still I did manage to educate a few before I got banned, some left with very different views on Greenpeace once they knew enough to see past their initial reaction to the misleading headlines

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Bogweevil

Member
With the massive issue of cooking oil supply world wide would it be prudent for the government to at least scrutinise any data since the ban to see if there is a genuine argument for the reintroduction of this seed dressing.

Surely this is an emergency measure which could be introduced which would allow UK farmers to actually harvest a crop for valuable use.

Did it affect bees and what results has the ban achieved?

It was found in wild flowers near treated fields, persisted much longer in soil than we were led to believe, affected wild bees foraging ability.

Unlikely to be te- approved.

More osr about so growers seem to be getting the measure of it.
 

farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
Agree, too many people in this country for whom £5 for a loaf of bread is affordable.
"Price worth paying to rid the world of the nasty man in Russia"
£5 per loaf would price wheat value at around £4-5000/tonne!! The value of the flour in a loaf of bread is only about 10p for every £100 that wheat is £200/T 20p of flour in the loaf, £300/T 30p of flour in a loaf. Ukrainians are paying a far greater price for protecting their country than 20p on the value of a loaf.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
It was found in wild flowers near treated fields, persisted much longer in soil than we were led to believe, affected wild bees foraging ability.

Unlikely to be te- approved.

More osr about so growers seem to be getting the measure of it.
Still available as dog flea treatment though? And blanket insecticide spray? Teppeki and incyst are neonics aren't they?
 

Against_the_grain

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
S.E
It was found in wild flowers near treated fields, persisted much longer in soil than we were led to believe, affected wild bees foraging ability.

Unlikely to be te- approved.

More osr about so growers seem to be getting the measure of it.
The reason it was banned was due to vastly over hyped and mis-interpreted media reporting only one side of the evidence.
In the attached article it states that only 3.5% of the results showed a negative outcome for the bees. Perhaps (although a very small percentage) this would be enough to bring about a ban causing many growers to walk away from a very profitable crop and indeed change the dynamics of our nations ability to be self sufficient in oilseeds. However 2.7% of results actually showed a positive outcome for bees. It could just as easily be argued that banning neo-nics is actually detrimental to bee outcomes especially when you consider how many acres of this crop are now not available for the bees to pollinate. Effectively 96% of the results showed no detrimental effect on the outcomes of the bees, yet here we are.

 
My local bee farmer had his bees pollen collected and tested by cranfield university
I have never seen the results published so assume that there was no race of nicotinoids in the bees pollen

the biggest problems of bee farmers are not farmers pesticide use
It is the weather

the U.K. will just have to learn to not use cooking oil
Boiled potatoes and veg roast meats ect
 

Bogweevil

Member
The reason it was banned was due to vastly over hyped and mis-interpreted media reporting only one side of the evidence.
In the attached article it states that only 3.5% of the results showed a negative outcome for the bees. Perhaps (although a very small percentage) this would be enough to bring about a ban causing many growers to walk away from a very profitable crop and indeed change the dynamics of our nations ability to be self sufficient in oilseeds. However 2.7% of results actually showed a positive outcome for bees. It could just as easily be argued that banning neo-nics is actually detrimental to bee outcomes especially when you consider how many acres of this crop are now not available for the bees to pollinate. Effectively 96% of the results showed no detrimental effect on the outcomes of the bees, yet here we are.


The Slate, known for contrarian viewpoints. The weight of scientific evidence is that certain neonics persist for a long time in the environment and are present in drinking water. No
Still available as dog flea treatment though? And blanket insecticide spray? Teppeki and incyst are neonics aren't they?

It is the scale of field use that causes concern.

Pet collars will no doubt be further regulated in time to protect rivers. There is no evidence that the tiny levels in rivers cause harm but who knows?

Teppeki is not a neonic, it disrupts aphid feeding, incysyt, gazelle etc are neonics with very low activity on bees. They are very valuable in preventing resistance.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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