Jacking up a livestock shed

aled1590

Member
Location
N.wales
Is it too low for the machinery used for the job or too low regarding ventilation? By the time you strip and remove roof and extend stanchions you will be nearly at buying a new kit form type if price to stick somewhere else!!!
Too low for both. It was built when ADAS funded it and came up with idea of low roof thinking it was better for sheep! As it is now it’s pretty useless. Be a shame to pull it down and leave perfectly good steel, if not better than what you get these days to pile up and be forgotten about!
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
The rafters will spread under the weight if you start cutting it about , the end plate is twice the depth of the rafter section and relies on the haunch to maintain roof pitch angle and transfer tension down to foundations
depends how you jack it or lift it
it could be done, not sure its sensible though
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Can you not doing something more creative with the roof to improve the ventilation and make it more suitable for cattle?
Nail on head time
it needs better apex ventilation
our cubicle shed is lower than that but has good eaves and apex ventilation and we have never had a case of pneumonia in there but we have in the shed next door that has poor ventilation but is 16 foot to the eaves
 

kill

Member
Location
South West
how about this then
make extentions for the legs with a series of holes in them weld them on first then you can lift it up a bit working on one leg at a time
Find several high lift jacks but I’d be welding or clamping some guides on to assist The force so it stays as a dead straight upwards lift And then tack a piece of angle on an outer edge and remove guides and weld gusset in place
 

Nearly

Member
Location
North of York
Find several high lift jacks but I’d be welding or clamping some guides on to assist The force so it stays as a dead straight upwards lift And then tack a piece of angle on an outer edge and remove guides and weld gusset in place
Standard procedure in USA was to take the sheet off above each upright. Then weld extra onto the upright with a plate at each side to guide the rafter up. Then elevate slowly.

A new shed somewhere else and the hire of a bobcat would be cheaper than a crash of sheets.

Hold my beer!
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
When they put up my barn I had a chat with the contractor and he was telling me the foundations for each stanchion are there to keep the shed down, not to support it. So any attempt to lift the structoure ought to be done with that in mind. A strong wind and you have a hang glider!
 

aled1590

Member
Location
N.wales
Can you not doing something more creative with the roof to improve the ventilation and make it more suitable for cattle?
The shed floor is lower than the outside yard level. When it rains heavily it completely floods. Had to empty shed twice this winter gone as sheep were up to their knees in water. To get floor to correct level to match the shed beside it I doubt you could get a skid steer in
 

Forum statistics

Threads
184,026
Messages
4,190,335
Members
46,114
Latest member
Bella_vista

Agricultural contractors and their role in the farming industry

  • 133
  • 0


Agricultural contractors and their role in the farming industry

Written by

Will is joined by Ian Maddever, an agricultural contracting expert, and Charlie Yorke from NFU Mutual to talk about agricultural contracting, how the industry has changed and the role it now plays in the farming industry.

Continue reading more on Rock and Roll Farming...
Top