JCB develops hydrogen combustion engine and outlines plans for the future of propulsion

LAMMA365

Member
Media
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With lots of legislative changes coming in the next years and decades regarding the use of fossil, hydrocarbon and polluting fuels, JCB has outlined its views on the future of propulsion.



With a range of options under consideration, most exciting and relevant to the agricultural sector is the firm’s recently developed hydrogen engine.



JCB chair Lord Anthony Bamford says the company is ahead of the curve in developing alternatives to the fossil fuel burning internal combustion engine (ICE).



He says: “Much of the legislation regarding emissions is aimed at cars, the biggest emitters of CO2 in the UK, with petrol and diesel powerplants being banned by 2030.



“However, strict rules on HGVs are now firmly in place.



“The sale of fossil fuel burning HGVs will start in 2035, with a phase out for vehicles weighing from 3.5 to 26 tonnes, and 2040 for vehicles weighing more than 26 tonnes.



“As a manufacturer of equipment and engines, we need to be at the forefront of developing alternatives that can be used in all machinery, hence why I challenged our employees on the use of hydrogen in a combustion engine.”

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forblue

Member
What happens then if hydrogen doe's not work, i agree batteries are no good, what is the answer i have no idea, unfortunately whether you agree or not the problem this country faces including the world is population growth which has caused all of the present problems, hydrogen is produced by electricity, how is that produced by building more nuclear power stations, yes, but then what do we do with the atomic waste i am sure future generations would love that, this country seems to wait until there is a problem before doing anything, as an example car's, they have got longer, wider, heavier and faster, yes some are more economical but they are going the same way with the battery ones, 0-60 and top speed, why when surely range is more important, of course we do need a leader with brains, our mis-fortune is what we have. This should cause a nice eruption.
 

vantage

Member
Location
Pembs
What happens then if hydrogen doe's not work, i agree batteries are no good, what is the answer i have no idea, unfortunately whether you agree or not the problem this country faces including the world is population growth which has caused all of the present problems, hydrogen is produced by electricity, how is that produced by building more nuclear power stations, yes, but then what do we do with the atomic waste i am sure future generations would love that, this country seems to wait until there is a problem before doing anything, as an example car's, they have got longer, wider, heavier and faster, yes some are more economical but they are going the same way with the battery ones, 0-60 and top speed, why when surely range is more important, of course we do need a leader with brains, our mis-fortune is what we have. This should cause a nice eruption.
Electricity for use to produce hydrogen does not have to be nuclear. The most reliable source of generating it is tidal, unfortunately there seems to be no political will to do this, perhaps because after the build phase there will be very little more money to be made from it. Britain has one of the highest tidal changes in the World, that’s a LOT of energy to be harnessed!
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
Electricity for use to produce hydrogen does not have to be nuclear. The most reliable source of generating it is tidal, unfortunately there seems to be no political will to do this, perhaps because after the build phase there will be very little more money to be made from it. Britain has one of the highest tidal changes in the World, that’s a LOT of energy to be harnessed!
Bollox
If tide power worked it would be working now
You cant control the sea
Wind power is most reliable in uk, plenty spare capacity at night to make hydrogen
 

blackisleboy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Tide will work and can work. Location is the problem - environmentalists won't let it be constructed in the best locations. There are plenty places where tidal lagoons and barriers could be built, but won't be allowed.
But do these same ones come up with any alternative solutions - of course not.

We need to accept that to produce clean energy then something has to be sacrificed - landscape for wind, future uncertainty of waste for nuclear, carbon cycle for fossil fuels, some sea mammals and creatures for tidal.

It's just a case of when the demand for energy outweighs the NIMBY and sandal wearers.....
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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