Jobs allied to farming

Hello,

I posted on here before asking about drystone walling as a potential profession to go alongside farming, and I got some really informative responses.

Would anyone be able to give me some more advice on other jobs that are related/allied to farming that would be interesting and would allow me to farm on the side.

From having a look online I have found rural surveying, agriculture consultancy, hedgelaying, agroecology

I would be willing to work towards professional qualifications.

Agronomy seems to be something that crops up a lot (no pun intended) but I'm not much interested in the arable side of farming.

Any more ideas?
 
In my opinion the future growth industry will be environmental advisors
Particularly able to offer Carbon audits and sustainability audits

or someone who will put all your paperwork and systems correct ahead of the ever increasingly strict Red Tractor
So do the environmental advisors normally come from a professional background or are they experienced farmers?

Is their job useful and provide a positive impact to the client, or is it just pen-pushing for the sake of it?
 

toquark

Member
I'm a forester for 45 hours a week and farm on the side. The two jobs mesh together very nicely.

I know one or two who work for the department and farm part time. I know a few who work for other farmers on the books or self employed usually either milking or stock work and I know a few who contract to others, they're the ones who can't count.
 

curlietailz

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Sedgefield
So do the environmental advisors normally come from a professional background or are they experienced farmers?

Is their job useful and provide a positive impact to the client, or is it just pen-pushing for the sake of it?


well in my experience most advisors and inspectors are not farmers
But a farmer would be a fabulous inspector/advisor because they would have the practical experience to know how to apply the rules
I believe that in the future advisors will have to have professional qualifications such as RICS or a MSc in Environmental Management

( which is why I’m doing one myself with the OU.... just got the final Dissertaion/Project module to do )
 
I'm a forester for 45 hours a week and farm on the side. The two jobs mesh together very nicely.

I know one or two who work for the department and farm part time. I know a few who work for other farmers on the books or self employed usually either milking or stock work and I know a few who contract to others, they're the ones who can't count.
When you say forester do you mean someone that practices the hands-on management of the trees or is it a more office based role?
 

Bald Rick

Moderator
Livestock Farmer
Location
Anglesey
Well that's good to hear as I find the art of stone walling fascinating. Although unfortunately I'm no George Clooney lookalike.

Are there many start up costs for stone walling?

No idea of your location (which is ALWAYS useful) but remember that walls have a regional “signature” and you’d have to construct to those standards to be sure of work.

(Although when I was in N Yorkshire, I was sure that they just lobbed stones in the general direction and hoped that they’d stick ...)

I would think there would be an active association where you live that would offer training, help etc

 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
No idea of your location (which is ALWAYS useful) but remember that walls have a regional “signature” and you’d have to construct to those standards to be sure of work.

(Although when I was in N Yorkshire, I was sure that they just lobbed stones in the general direction and hoped that they’d stick ...)

I would think there would be an active association where you live that would offer training, help etc

but its like sheep shearing its a bit different thinking about it than doing it.

Advisors, Agronomists and consultants are . or certainly appear to be over supplied.... but still seem to be coining it in, relatively speaking.
 
No idea of your location (which is ALWAYS useful) but remember that walls have a regional “signature” and you’d have to construct to those standards to be sure of work.

(Although when I was in N Yorkshire, I was sure that they just lobbed stones in the general direction and hoped that they’d stick ...)

I would think there would be an active association where you live that would offer training, help etc

I'm West Midlands so I don't think there's a massive amount of drystone walling in the immediate local area, but nearby places like Shropshire, Peak District, Welsh borders, North Staffs may have more
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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