John Deere small baler

Jsmith2211

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Somerset
Our old 456a was a good baler, but I was always disappointed on how uneven the bale length was! Ours had a patch welded In the floor but nothing to be surprised about when you think some are probably pushing 40 years old now. As long as bushings, guides and bearings have been maintained nothing too expensive to worry about. You need to hear one running to really tell what health its in, the ram tends to bang when it needs re shimming etc. Should sound smooth.
Here is a video I have from the chap selling it. Have another where the pickup isn’t spinning as apparently there is a lever to turn it on and off (tensioning a belt maybe?) pickups a bit squeaky but it is on our 572, put some crop in it and that goes away. All looks and sounds like she’s ready to work really. Can’t see that a patch in the floor would make any difference as long as it’s done right, especially since this baler is for sale in Newquay which is right next to the sea.

 

Pringles

Member
Location
West Fife
That baler sounds sweet enough to me.

I would definitely be having a right good look to see if the chamber had been patched when you go to see it on Saturday.

The 342 that grainboy is selling looks very expensive to me for what is a very old baler with a narrow pickup and slow plunger rate. Your 124 would run like a sewing machine compared to that baler. I certainly would not part with that sort of figure for a 342!

I am sure that @Stw88 is having problems with the shear bolts because the shearpin bushes are worn.
 

Jsmith2211

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Somerset
That baler sounds sweet enough to me.

I would definitely be having a right good look to see if the chamber had been patched when you go to see it on Saturday.

The 342 that grainboy is selling looks very expensive to me for what is a very old baler with a narrow pickup and slow plunger rate. Your 124 would run like a sewing machine compared to that baler. I certainly would not part with that sort of figure for a 342!

I am sure that @Stw88 is having problems with the shear bolts because the shearpin bushes are worn.
Looks like it has from the picture, but not sure if I’m really worried about it. So long as the weld is good i can’t see how it would affect the bales it makes. Yes the 342 seems expensive, all balers are expensive at the moment though. Finding a 459 under 5k is hard at the moment!
 

FG.

Member
Location
North Wiltshire
I've run a 456a for 20 odd years, knocking out an average of about 7k a yr and a 342a from new before that.
I wouldn't go for a 342a, but if your only doing a couple thou, you'd be fine.
Get a bar under the plunger and check for bearing and guide wear.
All fixable, but affects knife function.
Pop gearbox drain plug out and see what comes out.
If
 
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grainboy

Member
Location
Bedfordshire
That baler sounds sweet enough to me.

I would definitely be having a right good look to see if the chamber had been patched when you go to see it on Saturday.

The 342 that grainboy is selling looks very expensive to me for what is a very old baler with a narrow pickup and slow plunger rate. Your 124 would run like a sewing machine compared to that baler. I certainly would not part with that sort of figure for a 342!

I am sure that @Stw88 is having problems with the shear bolts because the shearpin bushes are worn.

Looks like it has from the picture, but not sure if I’m really worried about it. So long as the weld is good i can’t see how it would affect the bales it makes. Yes the 342 seems expensive, all balers are expensive at the moment though. Finding a 459 under 5k is hard at the moment!
Everything is negotiable,
As said, difficult to find genuine machines of any description,
 

johnboy87

Member
Hello all.

I currently make around 200 4ft round bales of hay, but i'm looking to do some of this in smalls instead, as well as baling some for other people. Therefore i am in the market for a small baler. I like the look of the deeres because of the auger feed and the gear driven knotters, so no chain to go out of time and smash the needles off (which happened on our old 124). I've found two that are in my budget, both being a 456a. Does anybody here have advice on this? Is the 456a a good baler, and what should i look for when i go and view one of these balers? I will link them both underneath. Both would have to be transported home on a lorry as are over 100 miles away from me (or a long day's drive to get them i suppose).

Thanks in advance


Only thing I'd say is it is still possible to bale the needles as the old man had that happen on his old 456a, we think part of the reason was because the ram stop seized so didn't swing out when required so make sure it Moves in and out as the ram goes back and forth
 

Jsmith2211

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Somerset
Well... for better or for worse I am now the owner of a 456a. Hopefully she works OK. All looked alright in person, couldnt see any in/out or back/forth play in the flywheel so hopefully thats all OK and she wont smash sheer bolts, and all the worm gears and that in the knotters look tight. Looks a tidy genuine baler to me. Aparently it came in on part ex. I'll let you know how i get on with it when it arives and i try to do a bit of rebaling with some broken rounds ive got. On a similar theme, does anybody have a sledge for sale relatively local to the wellington/taunton area in somerset? Prefferably a cooks windrower as i am told they are the type to get. Also on the twine, I assume it has to be 10,000ft? We've got some twine we used to use in the round baler before we switched to net but am i right in assuming that will be too thin?
 

FG.

Member
Location
North Wiltshire
Good luck with the baler.
Yes you need to use the 10,000ft twine.
I'd change gearbox oil and if its hydraulic tension, change the hydraulic oil and clean tank.
Also run knifes past each other and adjust plunger accordingly.
Very tiresome if bales hang on to each other.
 

Jsmith2211

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Somerset
Good luck with the baler.
Yes you need to use the 10,000ft twine.
I'd change gearbox oil and if its hydraulic tension, change the hydraulic oil and clean tank.
Also run knifes past each other and adjust plunger accordingly.
Very tiresome if bales hang on to each other.
Is it a good idea to take the knives off and sharpen them with an angle grinder? or is that not the done thing?
 

FG.

Member
Location
North Wiltshire
I've mig'ed missing chunks and grind.
A manual is handy for measurements etc.
The plunger runs on ball bearings and pads, so check the bearings haven't stopped turning and flat spotted, before any adjustment.
 

Jsmith2211

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Somerset
I've mig'ed missing chunks and grind.
A manual is handy for measurements etc.
The plunger runs on ball bearings and pads, so check the bearings haven't stopped turning and flat spotted, before any adjustment.
OK. I think it is a hydraulic tensioner, which is hopefully a good thing. I assume its just standard hydraulic oil in it? Also for the auto lube sustem do you fill it up with grease or oil? The manual (which is on JD's website) says to use special john deere multi lube or something like that, but that sounds expensive.
 

solo

Member
Location
worcestershire
Get yourself a manual and most of your questions will be answered. It was liquid grease in the auto lube from memory, but doesn’t use much. The hydraulic tensioner was jd 303 transmission oil era on mine ,but the current jd hytran would be equivalent I would have thought. The manual would confirm this.
 

FG.

Member
Location
North Wiltshire
I get on ok with the hydraulic tension.
Yes, normal 32/46 oil, seems to have worked fine.
Check the bicycle size drive chain, behind the reservoir.
I'm a mug and always use JD auto lube oil and genuine flywheel shear bolts.
There's also a smaller shear bolt on the needle drive.
 
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Paul132

Member
Livestock Farmer
Have a look at stags online auction, a couple of sledges in that which would not be far from you. Or try Graham Holland he normally has a few in stock
 

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