kiwi beet harvesting buckets

marshfarmer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Norfolk
Hi, how's things?
Are they just pushing kyros type beet out with baskets? Messy and no cleaning, needs to be on dry sandy land. I had about 1/2 ac once that couldn't be got by harvesters bulldozed into them with a spud harvester and full width share in the end, I started trying to hand pull but was no where near as fit as I thought. I grow the sugar beet type ones and have the 6 rower in now, easy in this area innit, had a side loader and a Tim before, a good one it was too, but the losses just too high compared to the professionals so really they worked out cheapest. JMV
 
Grazing varieties tend to be out of the ground more than some and also lower dry matter. These suit a beet bucket system.
I started using a home made one to fill in between contractor availability. Use it all the time now. Lift a week or twos beet at a time when the conditions are good. When really wet I run them over an old stationary destoner to loose the majority of soil. Fed whole from there. Cheap system on your own unit but don't burn your bridges with contractors just yet!
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
Hi, how's things?
Are they just pushing kyros type beet out with baskets? Messy and no cleaning, needs to be on dry sandy land. I had about 1/2 ac once that couldn't be got by harvesters bulldozed into them with a spud harvester and full width share in the end, I started trying to hand pull but was no where near as fit as I thought. I grow the sugar beet type ones and have the 6 rower in now, easy in this area innit, had a side loader and a Tim before, a good one it was too, but the losses just too high compared to the professionals so really they worked out cheapest. JMV

ok m8:)
you're right in way....but for small scale growing might be an idea.....no ancient harvester to maintain or no paying 3-4t/ac for contractor....always run sheep over afterwards....might have a go at a homemade one myself:eek:

wonder how @roscoe erf got on with his 'septic':scratchhead::D:D
 

marshfarmer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Norfolk
ok m8:)
you're right in way....but for small scale growing might be an idea.....no ancient harvester to maintain or no paying 3-4t/ac for contractor....always run sheep over afterwards....might have a go at a homemade one myself:eek:

wonder how @roscoe erf got on with his 'septic':scratchhead::D:D
I now went to Northrepps to look at some baskets, there's selection there to get a start, and make one. Was going to drop the beet a few weeks ago to stick with maize, now had a total swing round, 12row folding drill came home the other week, bought a cleaner last week ( another one, to keep the other three company, one of them must work) and gonna stick as many fodder beet in as I can, but for 80 pounds an acre no harvesting gear will be bought.
Guess you can't use if you run sheep over it afterwards, but why can't they harvest their own beet?
 

Steffan

New Member
Grazing varieties tend to be out of the ground more than some and also lower dry matter. These suit a beet bucket system.
I started using a home made one to fill in between contractor availability. Use it all the time now. Lift a week or twos beet at a time when the conditions are good. When really wet I run them over an old stationary destoner to loose the majority of soil. Fed whole from there. Cheap system on your own unit but don't burn your bridges with contractors just yet!
Do you have any pictures of the bucket? Been looking at agriboss beet harvesting bucket from nz
 
Do you have any pictures of the bucket? Been looking at agriboss beet harvesting bucket from nz

Easy answer is not really.
Mark one was dung grab with fillers between tines and a front lip to knock the beet over.
Mark two is a grass fork which is bigger and doesn’t need fillers as the tines are closer. Same simple bar along the tine points to knock beet over rather than spear.
Keeping it simple. Has worked for the last couple of years..
 

Essil Salers

Member
Mixed Farmer
Easy answer is not really.
Mark one was dung grab with fillers between tines and a front lip to knock the beet over.
Mark two is a grass fork which is bigger and doesn’t need fillers as the tines are closer. Same simple bar along the tine points to knock beet over rather than spear.
Keeping it simple. Has worked for the last couple of years..
Any pictures please? Thanks
 
A couple of years lurking in the back of the shed. Simple tubes over a few tines and a bumper bar.
 

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S410man

New Member
Many thanks for the mention @Dragon

Black rock welding and machinery is my facebook page a bit more up to date than the website at the moment!

Few videos on there of them working aswell

07772 923854 any questions I'll do my best to answer or can put you in touch with someone local to you using one of our lifting buckets

Don't always get on here regularly to check messages so phone is best if possible

Regards
Ryan
Black rock welding and machinery
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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