Leaving hay to "sweat"

He’s not he’s correct, never gone for this sweating or curing malarkey. Our hay always in shed within 24hrs, about 250,000 bales in last 30yrs. Make it right👍
People who talk about sweating/curing etc live in places where there is more rain! We have 64" a year, I know it is a dry period now, but maybe places with 18" a year don't have to worry so much about baling when it's not quite fit!
 
Location
Ceredigion
Baling again
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Anybody heard the saying (from about 50 years ago) "good hay makes in the shed".
That was with small bales. The beauty of rounds is you can leave them outside for a few weeks with minimal harm from the weather.

If you can stack it straightaway I think you've just got baked stalks which will not be as good. There's a reason why it's called hay MAKING, I don't know of any other crop described in that way
 

Agrivator

Member
Anybody heard the saying (from about 50 years ago) "good hay makes in the shed".
That was with small bales. The beauty of rounds is you can leave them outside for a few weeks with minimal harm from the weather.

If you can stack it straightaway I think you've just got baked stalks which will not be as good. There's a reason why it's called hay MAKING, I don't know of any other crop described in that way

Round bales left out in the field tend to get wet, one side gets discloured, they leave a yellow stunted patch and the aftermath gets damaged when they are eventually lifted.

As Derrick says, if it's fit to bale, it's fit to stack. And bales stacked immediately are far cleaner to work with during winter.
 

SierraLima

Member
Livestock Farmer
300 quadrants of hay baled here so far this week. Hauled in straight away and stacked in a lattice 3 high as to allow air to circulate through the stack. Bang metal rods into a few to keep a eye on things. Re stacked in due course up tight. If left for any amount of time even in this weather they get bloody damp underneath.
 

Pan mixer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Near Colchester
People who talk about sweating/curing etc live in places where there is more rain! We have 64" a year, I know it is a dry period now, but maybe places with 18" a year don't have to worry so much about baling when it's not quite fit!
We get about 23 inches of rain here, I make hay most of the summer on different types of grass, conservation areas and so forth.

I very rarely bale hay that hasn't been drizzled on at least and have some stuff that is too poor for the power stations at present that has been cut 5 weeks.

I usually leave my small bale hay (I only do about 4000) to stand for a week or two in 56's before stacking, I have learned what it is like to stack hay too quick, I use salt too if things are a little delicate moisture wise.

They seem fine like that, I am lucky to have some empty cattle yards though this time of the year. This was the picture this evening for example, just finished a field.

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neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
300 quadrants of hay baled here so far this week. Hauled in straight away and stacked in a lattice 3 high as to allow air to circulate through the stack. Bang metal rods into a few to keep a eye on things. Re stacked in due course up tight. If left for any amount of time even in this weather they get bloody damp underneath.

Asolutely. Yet I drove past a field today that had quadrants of hay lieing out in it, and the grass around them was 4-6” high and lush green. The bottom third of those bales must be musty, damp rubbish by now? I know the farm and they have empty cattle sheds currently, so you have to wonder wtf was going on.. :scratchhead:
 
We get about 23 inches of rain here, I make hay most of the summer on different types of grass, conservation areas and so forth.

I very rarely bale hay that hasn't been drizzled on at least and have some stuff that is too poor for the power stations at present that has been cut 5 weeks.

I usually leave my small bale hay (I only do about 4000) to stand for a week or two in 56's before stacking, I have learned what it is like to stack hay too quick, I use salt too if things are a little delicate moisture wise.

They seem fine like that, I am lucky to have some empty cattle yards though this time of the year. This was the picture this evening for example, just finished a field.

View attachment 975413
my ex wife said they put salt over the bales in Denmark too, if it is too damp. I wonder why or how it helps? I have done that when we bale something a bit iffy too.
 

LIVE - DEFRA SFI Janet Hughes “ask me anything” 19:00-20:00 20th September (Today)

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Hello, I’m Janet Hughes. I’m the Programme Director for the Future Farming and Countryside Programme in Defra – the programme that’s phasing out the Common Agricultural Policy and introducing new schemes and services for farmers.



Today (20 September) between 7pm-8pm, I and some of my colleagues will be answering your questions about our work including the Sustainable Farming Incentive, Farming in Protected Landscapes, and our test and trials.



We’ll try to answer at least 15 of your top voted questions, so please vote on the questions you’d most like me to answer.



You can read more about our Future Farming policy on our blog.



I’ve answered some of your questions previously: you can watch the videos on...
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