lely cock pheasant

KMA

Member
Location
Dumfriesshire
Bit of twine, punch and a small hammer make the job easier as long as you have everything in the right position first of course. Old haybob tines make excellent round the corner punches for those awkward flywheel shear-bolt bits on the T20, just cut it off on the long bit and grind down the tip a bit. The spring steel in old tines make good punches.
 

Goweresque

Member
Location
North Wilts
Go on, it's a hateful job, thankfully our haybob is only used for rowing up infront of the small square baler so doesn't get a lot of use.

Thing is its so long since I did one I can't fully remember!

IIRC you take the tine off, remove all the old spring and roll pin, and then by knocking the roll pin back in just enough to engage the new spring you can then use the cup shaped bit (where the tine bolts to) to wind the spring tension up, you have to only have enough of the roll pin through so that it can go through the slot and complete a whole circle. I think you have to knock the roll pin in one way then the other to allow it to complete the circle.

Something like that anyway - the principle being you rotate the shaft the spring is on in order to tighten the spring, not try and force it on under tension.

Or you buy a Fransgard, which is a 2 minute job, and no swearing.

Edit: here 's a video, good old Youtube:
 
A few posts back there was talk of inverting the sward. This is my last bit of haylage, so the pressure is off, and I thought I'd enjoy myself. I rowed the crop up the night before to dry the ground, and wanted the rows moved onto the dry bit. The Allis hadn't been out for over a year,and needed a tow start, but never missed a beat, top gear all the way.
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RusticRatbag46

New Member
It had its good points, but also its limitations. Getting the wheels set at exactly the right height to pick all the grass up was a nightmare first time through. Constant punctures and wheel bearing failures were enough to make a shepherd shag his dog!
The gear box was too weak and prone to failure. The haybob was a revolution the killed it stone dead. Then the likes of the Lely stabilo yet another revolution.
Agreed, the Pheasant was difficult to use properly but when it was all you had….and was better than the Acrobat (in skilled hands the Acrobat was quite good at rowing up grass for silage). The Haybob was a revelation when we could afford one but it used to shed wheels at the worst moments. And changing those tines…
And when we got a Stabilo, and a new tractor to run it - a cab! And aircon! Hay making was a pleasure.
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Agreed, the Pheasant was difficult to use properly but when it was all you had….and was better than the Acrobat (in skilled hands the Acrobat was quite good at rowing up grass for silage). The Haybob was a revelation when we could afford one but it used to shed wheels at the worst moments. And changing those tines…
And when we got a Stabilo, and a new tractor to run it - a cab! And aircon! Hay making was a pleasure.
Haymaking has never been a pleasure since they put cabs on the tractors! Pulling a tedder with a DB 780 in high pto , engine ticking over, listening to the birds sing and a baler thumping away in the background was heaven, nearly worth stacking 10,000 hay balesin a sweaty dutch barn with only a lister elevator to put the bales up 😀
 

Spencer

Member
Location
North West
Haymaking has never been a pleasure since they put cabs on the tractors! Pulling a tedder with a DB 780 in high pto , engine ticking over, listening to the birds sing and a baler thumping away in the background was heaven, nearly worth stacking 10,000 hay balesin a sweaty dutch barn with only a lister elevator to put the bales up 😀
My old man used to have a saying for folk who liked hay time and little bales....

"They like it.., cause they've never bloody done any.."
 
Location
Ceredigion
Looked on you tube they seem to do a good job. I know where there is a tidy one for sale which has been fitted with new belts, tyres and tines. My plan was to buy it and leave it in a 15 acre field 3 mile from home to turn the grass with. It could stay in the field all year in an old sheep hut. I know they are from a different era but what's people's thoughts on them who have used them.
Is it still parked in the shed ?
 

andybk

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Mendips Somerset
cock pheasant great for hay even more perfect for red clover silage / haylage as it doesnt beat the leaves off , much more gentle action turns crop over ,awful on the road , used to drive 5 miles between fields along busy lanes , with a MF 135 or the 35 and we all know what their brakes were like , either on or off lol , Was the mounted one called a flying pheasant ?
 

andybk

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Mendips Somerset
When machinery goes out of fashion - then is the time to buy..................
400 hundred quid or so will get a useable sh hand haybob if yr keep yr eye on the lookout.
having a spare one or 2 helps when breakdown or for spares.
Keeping machinery costs down is a top priority for me.
bought a 360 haybob for less than that last spring , now thats a useful tool , took some getting used to , but better value than most of the rakes out there
 

cattleman123

Member
Location
devon
Haymaking has never been a pleasure since they put cabs on the tractors! Pulling a tedder with a DB 780 in high pto , engine ticking over, listening to the birds sing and a baler thumping away in the background was heaven, nearly worth stacking 10,000 hay balesin a sweaty dutch barn with only a lister elevator to put the bales up 😀
Cabs a brillant at least you dont get wet when the thunderstorm arrives
 
A few posts back there was talk of inverting the sward. This is my last bit of haylage, so the pressure is off, and I thought I'd enjoy myself. I rowed the crop up the night before to dry the ground, and wanted the rows moved onto the dry bit. The Allis hadn't been out for over a year,and needed a tow start, but never missed a beat, top gear all the way.View attachment 369660 View attachment 369662
I had forgotten these great photos. We potentially have the exact same set up if I get my act together and do some tinkering before next season, but when I showed my lovely assistant what she would be driving, she was less than enthusiastic. I would like to find a few little jobs for our Allis and I thought the padded seat might be a bonus, but she said she prefers the B250 with the Kuhn single rotor rake on the back. :)
 
I had forgotten these great photos. We potentially have the exact same set up if I get my act together and do some tinkering before next season, but when I showed my lovely assistant what she would be driving, she was less than enthusiastic. I would like to find a few little jobs for our Allis and I thought the padded seat might be a bonus, but she said she prefers the B250 with the Kuhn single rotor rake on the back. :)
When time permits, it's hard to beat the open air, and smell of grass and TVO. Still wouldn't like to have it all to do with this outfit though. :)
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
The Robin Hood was a Cock Pheasant lookalike. One horizontal rotating shaft with tines that could be raised or lowered and the angle of travel altered. Two pairs off doors on the back with a central column that could be removed along with the two middle doors making one wide door the whole width. Doors could be angled so directing the flow of hay/straw. PTO swappable on a couple of pinioned gears to change the flow of fodder from clock-wise to anti-clockwise, so lifting or firing the swathe. A brilliant if clumsy bit of kit for its day.
 

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

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Applying principles of regen ag can incur a range of on-farm challenges. Learn how innovative tools & machinery can help with these hurdles.

This event will be held online from 1pm to 2pm on Thursday 2nd December 2021 so please block it out in your diary.

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