Lister elevators

Montexy

Member
Are many Lister elevators still working?

They must have looked smart when new. Does the company still exist?

I've only seen oldish ones with pain in the neck petrol engines.
Used one back in the 70`s - saved alot of back breaking work thats if you could get it started! electric motor would have been a good upgrade.
 
We had an Ayrshire bale elevator when I was young which I think had a hopper you could fit for roots.

As a 7 year old, I was on the cart helping to feed the elevator. I had to have one foot on the bottom of the elevator in order to lift a bale on. Guess what happened - foot slipped and went down between the bottom cross member and the rotating lats - yes i was lucky but `off games` for the first half term at school!

We upgraded to an electric chain / hook Tong elevator which of course was named Pete..........
He was sold in full working order in 2011.
 

DaveB

Member
Location
Worcs
This late 1950s one is still in use, did a great deal of work in the 60s/70s , sugar beet , hay and straw bales, sacks of grain etc. Only used to top up bays of hay and straw now. Still with the original Villiers engine. Not sure what tractor is on the front of dray, but the dray and barn no longer exist.
pic 1970s.
img069.jpg
 

Richard98

Member
There used to be one here long before my time, dad remembers putting bales on it as a teenager (late 70s/early 80s). it had been converted to pto drive and the 135 used to drive it. he's often said how one day, the two blokes that worked on the farm had a row, dad was helping one of them throw bales on the bottom while the other stacked at the top. 'open that throttle boy and get them bales on there quick, we'll make him sweat up top'
 

puppet

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
sw scotland
The right timing was to load a bale as the top one fell off to give time for proper building. If they came too fast then putting a bale between the elevator and edge of the stack soon stalled it.
Other trick was just to push some back down
 
The right timing was to load a bale as the top one fell off to give time for proper building. If they came too fast then putting a bale between the elevator and edge of the stack soon stalled it.
Other trick was just to push some back down

Some were geared for different speeds, (home retro work)

Ours was original & Dad would put three on at a time, I was fed up trying to stack often getting buried in bales.
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
Very old company Lister sold out in 1965 now part of British aerospace
Feck :facepalm: I wonder which part of 'Multi-Level' technology got incorporated in building aeroplanes :scratchhead:
Did anyone have the toy one? My younger brother had the baler that held four little bales & they used to come out of the baler, the little toy elevator with the little handle that turned it & we used an uptipped shoe box as the barn.
Funny you should say that - we have a grand daughter and last week @Mrs Y B went rooting around in the attic for some farm animals for her. She uncovered my old Britain's farm. From the 1960's, survived my childhood and our kids'.........
20200809_185557.jpg

.....still got it's battery pack (disguised as a stack of bales).
Baler was a Bamford................

20200809_185337.jpg

..............I'm afraid the Fordson Major reflects on my 'vintage' somewhat, too :playful:
 
This late 1950s one is still in use, did a great deal of work in the 60s/70s , sugar beet , hay and straw bales, sacks of grain etc. Only used to top up bays of hay and straw now. Still with the original Villiers engine. Not sure what tractor is on the front of dray, but the dray and barn no longer exist.
pic 1970s.
View attachment 900082

Great picture. I can smell that hay & petrol & hear the engine chugging. We all had those sloping gormers back then

Tall barn would be struggle without the elevator.

When our barn was rebuilt I went for bigger but lower. Partly to manage without elevator but also more suitable to keep sheep & machinery in when not needed for bales.
 
Feck :facepalm: I wonder which part of 'Multi-Level' technology got incorporated in building aeroplanes :scratchhead:

Funny you should say that - we have a grand daughter and last week @Mrs Y B went rooting around in the attic for some farm animals for her. She uncovered my old Britain's farm. From the 1960's, survived my childhood and our kids'.........
View attachment 900228
.....still got it's battery pack (disguised as a stack of bales).
Baler was a Bamford................

View attachment 900229
..............I'm afraid the Fordson Major reflects on my 'vintage' somewhat, too :playful:

Great pictures you must be 20 years older than my brother. So mid 60's, sorry if that was rude
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
Next door had one right into the 70's - stored all their corn in bags :banghead:

Lorry drivers hated going there, they had to stand in their wagons and catch hold of the bag by it's @rse and let it empty out as it went over the side :facepalm:

It was a bad starter, too and as they weren't very 'mechanically minded', I often had to go and get it going (usually a case of taking the plug out to clean/dry/re-set it).
Went one morning after three of them, plus the lorry driver had been 'pulling at it' for about an hour to find they'd filled it up with diesel :banghead::banghead:
 

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