Maize 2022

Durry cows

Member
Location
Derbyshire
Trying to find some poultry muck! Considering upping the dap in contrast on some away ground that’s 0/1 indices, had some muck but thought it would benefit from more than 50kg/acre dap?
 
Trying to find some poultry muck! Considering upping the dap in contrast on some away ground that’s 0/1 indices, had some muck but thought it would benefit from more than 50kg/acre dap?

No, the 50kgish of DAP is a standard application, I would not consider omitting it unless you were on a P index of 4 or something.

For people with indices of 0 or 1 or 2 you need TSP or 0.24.24 in the seed bed as well. Maize needs to find phosphate very early in it's lifecycle, those little seminal roots need to find it to establish the plant. Growing maize on land with very low P or K indices is a recipe for disaster. If land is genuinely that infertile and hungry I would seriously be considering putting seed bed nitrogen in as well.

The availability of phosphate in cattle slurry is not that high.
 

sjt01

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Norfolk
No, the 50kgish of DAP is a standard application, I would not consider omitting it unless you were on a P index of 4 or something.

For people with indices of 0 or 1 or 2 you need TSP or 0.24.24 in the seed bed as well. Maize needs to find phosphate very early in it's lifecycle, those little seminal roots need to find it to establish the plant. Growing maize on land with very low P or K indices is a recipe for disaster. If land is genuinely that infertile and hungry I would seriously be considering putting seed bed nitrogen in as well.

The availability of phosphate in cattle slurry is not that high.
We have never seen a response to starter P. All MGA trials have shown that where starter fertilisers look as though they are doing good at earlier stages, by harvest the difference has disappeared, so they give you a psychological boost but little more.
We have used our normal digestate application - if we had more we would use more - pre drilling. Then we will put a bit of AN on if required (we use the MGA nitrogen predictor which we find works extremely well) and will use Efficient N28 at the latest time we can get the sprayer through the crop.
The main N need is when it is making the cob, and although we have not used Efficient N28 before, the many independent trials the MGA have done show that it is a cost effective way to apply N. We are also using it as the last dose on our winter barleys because I am more worried about the lack of supply of N for next year as much as the price.
 
Was thinking of putting more dap down the spout say 75kg/acre as oppose to 50 to supply mire p but also n?

DAP is or normally has been murder expensive compared to the basic P and K alternatives. Straight nitrogen will also be a sniff cheaper.

I will be honest, the bulk of the people I grew maize for around here lathered their fields in dung annually, used 40-50kg/acre of starter fertiliser and that was about it. A few applied some additional nitrogen to the seed bed but I could never hand on heart say I saw a genuine benefit from them doing so.

I used to religiously soil test a lot of land and have them correct P and K with TSP, MOP or 0.24.24 or the like. For a sizeable area, I would use fibrophos. The starter fertiliser I used was based on DAP but contained sulphur and some other trace elements. You could apply many these with a sprayer though. Yara do maiztrac I think it is.
 

Sparkymark

Member
No DAP at all for the first time this year. Instead we will spray a product on with the pre em that releases phosphates already in the soil. I tried it last year on a field and it worked well.
Plenty of box muck and slurry ploughed in also.
 
We have never seen a response to starter P. All MGA trials have shown that where starter fertilisers look as though they are doing good at earlier stages, by harvest the difference has disappeared, so they give you a psychological boost but little more.
We have used our normal digestate application - if we had more we would use more - pre drilling. Then we will put a bit of AN on if required (we use the MGA nitrogen predictor which we find works extremely well) and will use Efficient N28 at the latest time we can get the sprayer through the crop.
The main N need is when it is making the cob, and although we have not used Efficient N28 before, the many independent trials the MGA have done show that it is a cost effective way to apply N. We are also using it as the last dose on our winter barleys because I am more worried about the lack of supply of N for next year as much as the price.

I'm far from convinced the MGA were ever the leading authority on maize I'm afraid.

You are in a very different part of the country and on much kinder land. Come down here and you will see what a poorly maize crop looks like when it is short of P or K. Remember phosphate availability is poor in cold and damp soils.

Very few people in this part of the world seemed to bother with additional nitrogen in all honesty. Used to get excellent grain/cob yield anyway near regardless of what was done- the common denominator being the weather. Of course, in the major corn growing regions most nitrogen is applied before emergence anyway.

For me, the jury is definitely out on efficient N 28 for me and I have never routinely applied foliar type products to maize anyway, always preferring to look on a case by case basis. What I would much prefer is a summer with some seriously warm weather.
 
Location
West Wales
We’re sticking 50kg of DAP down the pipe as much muck as I can find before the plough. And adding humic acid. Probably use some foliar k as well as it’s competitive compared to granular currently.
 
IMG_20220419_122132.jpg


Last field for maize turning black here this morning. I've never grown maize before, it's all been bought in but I've 25ac of prospect going in this year..

Is next week too soon to drill? Is all light south facing ground
 
View attachment 1030245

Last field for maize turning black here this morning. I've never grown maize before, it's all been bought in but I've 25ac of prospect going in this year..

Is next week too soon to drill? Is all light south facing ground

I would buy a soil thermometer- about £10 from Amazon. It's still only April but I do not know what the forecast for the next two weeks is.
 

O'Reilly

Member
View attachment 1030245

Last field for maize turning black here this morning. I've never grown maize before, it's all been bought in but I've 25ac of prospect going in this year..

Is next week too soon to drill? Is all light south facing ground
Needs to be 8 Deg at 4" deep at 9 am for a week, and rising. The figures I've seen suggest that you will be fine, crack on. The earlier you drill, the earlier you harvest, and that's when the problems occur.
 

Serup

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Denmark
50-60 tons slurry incorporated per ha. Then 125 kg NP20-7 per ha with drilling. Thats it. My P quota is less than that, but i take from other crops. It's many years since i couldn't use DAP anymore.
we started drilling yesterday. About 50 days earlier than last year, when we had weeks and weeks of rain.

majssaaning.jpg
 

andrew830

Member
50-60 tons slurry incorporated per ha. Then 125 kg NP20-7 per ha with drilling. Thats it. My P quota is less than that, but i take from other crops. It's many years since i couldn't use DAP anymore.
we started drilling yesterday. About 50 days earlier than last year, when we had weeks and weeks of rain.

View attachment 1031127
How do you incorperate the slurry?What seed rate do you use?
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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